Month <span class=July 2015" src="/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/cropped-office-building-secondary-1.jpg">

Month July 2015

Tracking Progress with Your Sustainability Software

The SSC Team July 16, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
This article was written as an expansion of our white paper “Choosing Sustainability Management Software for your Business” published in July 2011.  Enjoy: We started with the axiom “if you want to manage it, you have to measure it”.  So now that you’ve given some thought to the software solution that you want to purchase, it’s critical for you to come up with your specific measurements.  We’re not just talking about your carbon footprint or how many gallons of water you’re using.  We’re talking about the primary way that you’ll keep score for yourself and your employees so that everyone can tell if you’re actually doing better.  We’re talking about picking your Key Performance Indicators. Type “Key Performance Indicators” into your Google search and you’ll get 6.4 million results (and counting).  With so much written elsewhere on them, we thought it would be useful to give you some suggestions on what you might want to consider implementing as your key sustainability performance indicator.  These “measurements of performance” are not a one-size-fits-all measurement – you have to figure out what makes sense for your business. The most commonly used measures reflect your company’s Green House Gas (GHG) emissions.  These may be represented as an absolute measure of your firm’s emissions (usually in tons) or in relative intensity, such as emissions per employee, emissions per retail area, or emissions per unit of production.  These GHG totals will frequently be provided as “CO2e,” or “Carbon Dioxide Equivalent,” given that CO2 is the most commonly known green house gas ahead of others such as methane, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and a host of other emissions. A second form of sustainability KPI revolves around the use of energy, water, and other inputs to a company’s business process.  This might include data on total energy or water usage or may again break down the metric on a relative intensity level.  Due to the wide variety of potential inputs and outputs for a firm’s processes, there isn’t really a standard emission measure. A third major form of sustainability KPI is focused around packaging and waste.  This may take the form of the amount or weight of packaging involved in business operations.  Or it may manifest itself as part of a “Zero Waste” pledge taken by a firm that is seeking to reduce, reuse, and/or recycle the byproducts of their business operations. A fourth and (for now) final form of sustainability KPI is that which is customized and specific to your individual business.  You know how you measure success financially, for employee performance, for sales performance, for safety performance.  Maybe these measurements are part of an intensity ratio based on a per-revenue-dollar basis, a per-billable-hour basis, or maybe they are simply expressed in absolute values (total hours of lost productivity due to accidents).  Maybe you can re-use those same measures for sustainability KPIs, or maybe you need to identify new ones. To assist with getting you started on identifying your own KPI’s, here are some quick examples that fit each of the four types mentioned above.  You could find many more from reviewing the Corporate Social Responsibility reports of the companies mentioned below as well as by reviewing your competitors, your partners, your suppliers and your customers own statements.  No matter what approach you decide to take, figure out the measures that will be the right ones for YOU.

Now that you’ve read this article, tell us what you think!  And be sure to check out the full white paper.

Sustainability Software: Total Cost of Ownership Revisited

The SSC Team July 14, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
This article was written as an expansion of our white paper “Choosing Sustainability Management Software for your Business” published in July 2011.  Enjoy: We touched on the TCO – Total Cost of Ownership – in the main white paper, but since the cost is such an important part of your decision making process we felt the need to dig into a little more detail.  Be sure to check in with your CFO, your CPA, your financial advisor, or with whomever else you typically engage for financial input as well.  They’ll definitely have a view of the important costs that are specific to your situation.  We’ll break the Total Cost of Ownership down into four main areas:  Acquisition, Implementation, Maintenance/Enhancement, and Growth.

Acquisition Costs...

...include all the money that you need to spend on purchasing your software solution.  They may include direct payments to your primary software vendor as well as any related software that you may need to purchase a license for.  Ideally, you’ll get all the software costs for the enterprise carbon accounting software rolled up into one cost from your vendor, but if you decide to add complementary packages or tools, they may cost you extra. Any hardware costs would also fall into this category.  You can avoid these if you choose a Software-As-A-Service (SaaS) model, but if you need to purchase new equipment for your end users – maybe laptops or tablets/phones for field data entry or memory upgrades for your existing equipment – make sure you include these costs in your TCO.  Your analysis should also account for any taxes and shipping/handling charges on hardware and software purchases.  You will most likely be able to capitalize these costs as they are related to the purchase of company assets; they may be eligible for tax credits or other incentives.  Be sure to check with your accountant for the correct treatment.

Implementation Costs...

...include all the effort necessary to install, set up, configure, test, train, and otherwise get your software ready for launch.  You may need to pay your vendor or a consultant to set up and install the software.  You also may need to allocate time for your internal associates or employees to do work as part of their day job. This internal staff cost is important – your folks may not be able to just absorb this extra work alongside their regular responsibilities.  This cost may be payment for temporary labor to come in and cover the daily office activities, or it may help you determine that you really do need to leverage your vendor or consultant to do more work.  Performing your initial data load and set up, testing all the reports and data interfaces, and training your users on how to use the tool, create reports, and otherwise maintain the information, are all critical.  You may even need to spend time (and money) educating users on why it is important to correctly track your environmental impact. Aside from all the labor costs, you might also need to set aside money for travel (to and from training, vendor locations, etc.), for incidentals (such as food and snacks for meetings and training sessions), and even simple things like office supplies to help you get the implementation done.  Similar to acquisition costs, you can most likely capitalize implementation.  However costs for tasks like training and data conversion may not be eligible for that treatment.  Again, check with your accountant for the correct handling of these costs.

Maintenance Costs...

...cover everything related to your core software system’s ongoing maintenance and enhancement that comes after the initial launch.  In some cases, your ongoing maintenance fees will be bundled with your upfront purchase – if they are, be sure you are specific about what period they cover (i.e. one year, three years, etc.) and what the correct accounting treatment is for these costs.  For planning purposes, your annual software license is approximately will typically be 20% of the upfront purchase costs of the software.  This may vary depending on a number of factors, including whether or not you are on a subscription model, so be sure you identify this with the vendor up front. Once the initial maintenance period is over, you’ll also want to make sure you account for any increases in fees that may occur.  You don’t want to get locked into using a system that suddenly escalates out of your budget a few years down the road because you didn’t get things spelled out up front.   Things like bug fixes, troubleshooting, and support are also be covered under this category.  Maintenance costs are most likely to be operational expenses.  If they’re bundled with your upfront purchase, be sure you know how to split them out appropriately – when you talk to your accounting folks, they’ll thank you for that.

Enhancement Costs...

...for the software are other types of “future costs” that you more than likely will not pay up front.  They’ll come into play when your software vendor releases version 2.0, 3.0, X.0, etc. of your software solution.  You may have the option to stay with your current version, but then you’ll miss out on all the new features, enhancements, bug fixes, and other goodies that your vendor has bundled with the new software.  Your best bet is to get a clear understanding of how often upgrades – that aren’t included free of charge – will come along and what the cost will be.  You should also be sure to capture any accompanying “implementation” costs that may be incurred.  Depending on the nature of the enhancement, you may be able to capitalize the cost as it will relate to an asset versus an operational cost, but once again be sure to check with your accountant.

Growth Costs...

...are the last major category of “future costs” that you should consider.  These costs are incurred when your usage of the software solution increases.  Maybe you start out with only a handful of users of the platform, but then want to scale up and have everyone in the company use the tool.  You may need to go from a “seat license” (for a single user) to a “site license” (for everyone at a single location) or an “enterprise license” (for everyone at your company).  Know these costs so they don’t break your business case down the road. You will also most likely increase the amount of data that you store over time.  This may be due to the addition of more sites, more data elements, or just more detail on your existing information.  Be sure you know when you’re likely to exceed a price threshold so that you can account for it in your planning process.  You may not be able to account for things like mergers and acquisitions at the present time, but you should have some idea of how you expect your business and usage of the system to grow over the next several years from your basic business planning, so be sure to include those details.  Depending on the specific driver for these costs, the accounting treatment may vary between capital and operating expense – try to provide your accountant with specifics when you talk to them.

Cost Timing...

...is important to each of these categories. Make sure you do some yearly projections so you know how much you are going to spend and when.  Your acquisition and implementation costs are most likely to occur in a relatively short time frame (maybe even in a single calendar year).  Your maintenance costs will almost certainly kick in at the start of Year 2, if not earlier.  Enhancement costs might show up yearly, beginning in Year 2 or Year 3.  Growth costs will hit whenever you hit those thresholds – try to make sure you’ve at least given yourself a year or maybe two of room in your initial contract.  You will need to consider the expected lifespan of the asset to determine just how many years forward you need to look.  A typical time frame for a smaller system may only be three years, but for a large enterprise level system that you have integrated with other major systems, you could be looking at a horizon of five or even seven years.  If you were wondering who could help you with that determination, you probably can guess who to ask: your accountant! Now that you’ve read this article, tell us what you think!  And be sure to check out the full white paper.

How to Get Your Company Moving Towards Sustainability

The SSC Team July 9, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
By: Alexandra Kueller Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you probably have noticed that “sustainability” is one of the biggest buzzwords today, especially within companies. Everyone is trying to be the most sustainable or have the best sustainability initiatives or be the most innovative. But what are you to do if you notice your company is lagging behind? Just ask. Thomas Smale, whose article “7 Reasons Why 'Just Ask' Is the Best Negotiation Tactic” was published on the Entrepreneur website, discusses how asking a direct question can lead you to effective negotiation. Keeping Smale’s points in mind, we added a little sustainability twist to help your company move towards sustainability.

1. Get a firm “yes” or “no”

Start by asking a direct question. “Has our company ever been involved in sustainability?” “Is sustainability something important to the company?” Get a feel for the climate and begin to lay your groundwork.

2. Provide information

When talking with your boss about sustainability, come prepared. Maybe you want to start small and implement office recycling. Research the cost, benefits, implementation time, etc. so when you talk to your boss, you can paint a better picture to allow them to understand every aspect of your request.

3. Get the negotiation back on track

Every conversation and negotiation can get off track. If you notice that happening, ask a more personal question related to sustainability, such as, “Do you have any concerns about having a sustainability strategy in the office?”

4. Gather missing information

You’ve done research on your end, and you’re ready to talk to your boss about sustainability. But even the most prepared people don’t have all of the information. By asking direct questions, you can start to fill in gaps on why sustainability isn’t a big priority in the office.

5. Get other people involved in the discussion

By asking a question, you’ve now cornered your boss into having a conversation about sustainability. From there, they might know other people who are interested in the topic as well. If you don’t ignite the conversation, you might now know where it could lead!

6. Come to a firm agreement

The right questions can lead you to a firm agreement. Find out if there are any resources that will allow you begin small sustainability-related projects around the office or see if you can present this topic to more people in a few weeks. Looking for ways to become a better sustainability consultant? Check out our blog post that talks about 8 steps to improving as a sustainability consultant!

Grow Your Sustainability Consultancy Business by Speaking Your Client’s Language

The SSC Team July 7, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this blog from the SSC archives: So, you know all about your prospective client and you’ve decided on the strongest business case for sustainability for their situation. Now it’s time to win them over and solidify the relationship with a smashing proposal or pitch.

1) Don’t think of a pitch as a sell, think of it as an educational opportunity

Don’t worry so much about whether or not the client is going to hire you at the time you are meeting with them. Instead, treat it like a customized webinar or mini-conference where you are showcasing your knowledge about sustainability, the realities of where the economy is heading, their specific opportunities in relation to sustainability, and what they will need to do to get ahead and effectively adopt sustainability in their corporate strategic framework. You are just showing them the raw ingredients, while keeping a hold of the recipe. 

2) Start at the very beginning, a very good place to start

So, you know all about sustainability. And you know all about your prospective client. Unfortunately, your audience, be it the CEO or a mid-level executive, may not know much more about sustainability than “I think it costs a lot, but everybody seems to be doing it.” Clear that up right away with a brief definition of strategic sustainability – use the definition you use for your own consultancy. Make sure the client know that sustainability is a business framework, not a philanthropic or public relations gesture. Drop a few names, too – Wal-Mart, GE, Nike, Rio Tinto, Toyota. It doesn’t hurt for your client to know that they are joining the ranks of commerce’s elite.

3) Stress the long term and a future of change

“Fundamentally, corporate sustainability is about exploring the next way your company will be successful, because almost all the things you currently rely on -- energy, supply chain, consumers, investors, regulation -- are going to change,” said David Bent from the non-profit sustainability organization Forum for the Future in a blog series for Greenbiz.com. Changing times demand that companies factor in future risks, such as rising energy prices, increased regulation, and pressure from consumers, into their strategic plans. Since many of these future risks and market changes are going to stem from environmental and social concerns, integrating sustainability principles into the corporate framework now, to address these issues now, isn’t just a “cost” to the business, it’s an investment in the future risk management. “You can’t predict ‘the’ future, but you had better be prepared for possible futures with a portfolio of strategies – and a business case – that ‘future-proof the company’ by diversifying your risk going forward,” advises Gil Friend, founder and CEO of Natural Logic. You must stress this fact to prospective clients – they will probably have to become sustainable eventually, but they might as well make some money doing it proactively instead of reactively. Just be sure to avoid scare tactics or pressure. The fact is: the world is changing, and change can be good.

4) Look to frame sustainability as a driver for innovation and opportunity

Find examples of “play-to-win” organizations that have used sustainability to tap into new opportunities (destroying the competition in the process) to help sell the concept. Companies are inherently competitive, but often are mired in a “compliance mentality.” Remind your audience that business is a battlefield; you might be able to tap into that competitive spirit. Use what you know about the company’s competitors or industry to highlight how the sustainability program may get them ahead of the game.

5) Present the client’s customized business case in a language that everyone can understand – shareholder value

It’s meat and potatoes time. You’ve briefly discussed sustainability, the risk of not acting, and the opportunity gained by taking action. Next is what they’ve all been waiting for – the business case. At this point, be fairly specific about what you feel the key “value drivers” of a sustainability program will be for this specific organization. First, present the business case. For example, an engineering firm with a zillion vacancies on its “careers” page and a reputation of an ‘old boys club’ may benefit from a sustainability program stressing competitive advantage – a program that will help its recruitment program, shape its industry, and help it become an early mover on new and emerging areas for growth (like green design, perhaps). Second, present the projected investment (in time and money) and the estimated return on investment (ROI). According to Friend, the business case has to provide a clear ROI in the financial, operational, and strategic dimensions. But be clear that ROI in sustainability isn’t only about short-term dollars and cents. When you are talking about elements like “recruitment” and “industry shaping,” be sure to clarify that these, albeit not short-term financial returns, are “indirect” returns. While direct returns include costs (lighting retrofits or waste-reduction), indirect returns ( impacts on brand reputational value, employee productivity and retention, product quality, community goodwill, etc.) can open companies to new business as much as any marketing plan while helping reduce risk. For an in-depth discussion on costing for sustainability, check out the book Making Sustainability Work by Marc Epstein. Third, use statistics, examples, graphics, and best practices, briefly but effectively, to back up your claims on how your proposed programs can directly affect shareholder value through direct and indirect returns. Finally, give the client a path on how a sustainability program for this value driver might be incorporated into their organizational framework.

6) Don’t frighten them off

Although you may have made an amazing pitch with ROI analysis that just can’t be denied, a client may still balk. “But we don’t have $150,000 for a lighting retrofit, even if we know it will save us $300,000 over the next six years…” Yes, it may be ideal if you could tackle each value driver head on, re-write the strategic plan, and reorganize the company, but, more likely, the financial minds at your prospect’s firm are going to be reluctant to loosen the purse strings. To help ease them into the process (and help you begin to form a long, trusting relationship), break it down into steps. Begin with saying, “Now that I’ve presented the strategic sustainability framework that will eventually deliver the most value to your organization, let’s talk about where we begin. Every journey starts with a series of small steps…” At this point, have one or two programs that will work as small but effective pilot programs for this broader sustainability plan. Try to find the one or two manageable programs with the lowest-hanging, least expensive fruit, and suggest that the client give them a try first. The pilots will help you build credibility with the CFO’s office, as well as awareness throughout the rest of the organization. Hopefully by achieving documented success with the first few pilot programs, the company will continue to draw on your services to expand into the more complex strategic development of their sustainability program (that you were the architect of).

7) Be straightforward about the business relationship

Once you’ve delivered the presentation (no more than an hour of their time) and have some concrete offerings available for them (green audits, waste audits, pilot ‘Green Team’ programs, stakeholder engagement initiatives, or whatever your other pilot programs were) be ready for questions. Know how long each program will take and what it may cost if they suddenly want to go whole hog. Be prepared to answer detailed questions about customer service, your ‘next steps’ in project development, your experience, your resources, costs of your service, as well as costs directly to them (retrofits, training investments, life-cycle-analyses, etc.) and the overall estimated ROI for each suggested program. Instead of spending your time trying to convince the client through testimonials of how great you are, just do what you do best: consult them. Show them what you know and use examples from research or from your past experience to illustrate how they, too, can meet their goals, transform their business, reduce their risk, and increase shareholder value through sustainability. You are simply the person with the tools to help them get the process started. Find out how you can become a better sustainability leader in one of our latest blogs.