Month <span class=August 2015" src="/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/cropped-office-building-secondary-1.jpg">

Month August 2015

Should You Pare Down Your Sustainability Agenda?

The SSC Team August 27, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this blog from the SSC archives: At the beginning of the year, a lot of people find themselves making long lists of things to achieve over the next 12 months. And ambitious sustainability agendas are no exception--it seems like we're always being pushed to do more, move faster, and achieve greater sustainability performance. After all -- we know that global challenges can't be solved by half-measures. Today, we're challenging the idea that you must do "better" sustainability by doing "more" sustainability-related activities. Instead, let's look at the benefits of doing less. And we'll start by reviewing an article called The Art of Adding by Taking Away by Matthew E. May, published last January in The New York Times. May begins his article with a quote from ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu: “To attain knowledge, add things every day. To attain wisdom, subtract things every day. Profit comes from what is there, usefulness from what is not there.” This saying sparked something in May, who began to investigate the logic of problem solving by taking things away: "It dawned on me that I’d been looking at my problem in the wrong way. As is natural and intuitive, I had been looking at what to do, rather than what not to do. But as soon as I shifted my perspective, I was able to complete the project successfully." May finds that there are many ways to tie the "doing more by doing less" thinking into the business world:
  • By removing distractions, companies can focus on what really matters.
  • By searching for patterns and finding common elements, companies can spot opportunities earlier and streamline decision-making.
  • By removing product features, companies can drive innovation and reach new audiences.
So what does this mean for sustainability practitioners? Take a hard look at your company's sustainability activities -- are they clearly aligned and focused with your business strategy? Are they designed to mitigate your biggest environmental and social impacts? Are they responsive to your key stakeholders? Or...are your company's sustainability activities spread too thin and flow in so many directions it is difficult to adequately keep track of them? If your sustainability agenda doesn't revolve around a clear strategy, it's time to get off the merry-go-round and do a little paring. Here's what we suggest:
  • Conduct a materiality assessment to identify and prioritize your (internal and external) stakeholders and what they care about. This will give you a short list of sustainability topics that are the most important, and a longer list of "nice to have" activities to tackle as time permits.
  • Assess each of your existing sustainability activities against a materiality matrix. If you find that activities are falling outside of the "must have" sustainability priorities, you should consider redirecting resources to more important places.
  • Develop guidelines to help you address the importance, effectiveness, and urgency of any new activities under consideration. This will keep you on the straight and narrow going forward.
If you'd like some help in conducting a materiality assessment, please contact us! We love to take clients through this process--it's enlightening, empowering, and energizing to identify what's important (and what you can leave behind). In the meantime, we love May's final advice about how to apply this thinking to your own life: "First, create a “not to do” list to accompany your to-do list. Give careful thought to prioritizing your goals, projects and tasks, then eliminate the bottom 20 percent of the list — forever." "Second, ask those who matter to you most — clients, colleagues, family members and friends — what they would like you to stop doing. Warning: you may be surprised at just how long the list is." "The lesson I’ve learned from my pursuit of less is powerful in its simplicity: when you remove just the right things in just the right way, something good happens." Have you tried this approach? We'd love to hear what you're giving up in 2014, and what you're making more room to do! Leave us a comment or join the conversation on Twitter.

Should You Pare Down Your Sustainability Agenda?

The SSC Team August 27, 2015 Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this blog from the SSC archives:

At the beginning of the year, a lot of people find themselves making long lists of things to achieve over the next 12 months. And ambitious sustainability agendas are no exception--it seems like we're always being pushed to do more, move faster, and achieve greater sustainability performance. After all -- we know that global challenges can't be solved by half-measures.

Today, we're challenging the idea that you must do "better" sustainability by doing "more" sustainability-related activities. Instead, let's look at the benefits of doing less. And we'll start by reviewing an article called The Art of Adding by Taking Away by Matthew E. May, published last January in The New York Times

May begins his article with a quote from ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu:

“To attain knowledge, add things every day. To attain wisdom, subtract things every day. Profit comes from what is there, usefulness from what is not there.”

This saying sparked something in May, who began to investigate the logic of problem solving by taking things away:

"It dawned on me that I’d been looking at my problem in the wrong way. As is natural and intuitive, I had been looking at what to do, rather than what not to do. But as soon as I shifted my perspective, I was able to complete the project successfully."

May finds that there are many ways to tie the "doing more by doing less" thinking into the business world:

  • By removing distractions, companies can focus on what really matters.
  • By searching for patterns and finding common elements, companies can spot opportunities earlier and streamline decision-making.
  • By removing product features, companies can drive innovation and reach new audiences.

So what does this mean for sustainability practitioners? 

Take a hard look at your company's sustainability activities -- are they clearly aligned and focused with your business strategy? Are they designed to mitigate your biggest environmental and social impacts? Are they responsive to your key stakeholders?

Or...are your company's sustainability activities spread too thin and flow in so many directions it is difficult to adequately keep track of them? If your sustainability agenda doesn't revolve around a clear strategy, it's time to get off the merry-go-round and do a little paring. Here's what we suggest:

  • Conduct a materiality assessment to identify and prioritize your (internal and external) stakeholders and what they care about. This will give you a short list of sustainability topics that are the most important, and a longer list of "nice to have" activities to tackle as time permits.
  • Assess each of your existing sustainability activities against a materiality matrix. If you find that activities are falling outside of the "must have" sustainability priorities, you should consider redirecting resources to more important places.
  • Develop guidelines to help you address the importance, effectiveness, and urgency of any new activities under consideration. This will keep you on the straight and narrow going forward.

If you'd like some help in conducting a materiality assessment, please contact us! We love to take clients through this process--it's enlightening, empowering, and energizing to identify what's important (and what you can leave behind).

In the meantime, we love May's final advice about how to apply this thinking to your own life:

"First, create a “not to do” list to accompany your to-do list. Give careful thought to prioritizing your goals, projects and tasks, then eliminate the bottom 20 percent of the list — forever."

"Second, ask those who matter to you most — clients, colleagues, family members and friends — what they would like you to stop doing. Warning: you may be surprised at just how long the list is."

"The lesson I’ve learned from my pursuit of less is powerful in its simplicity: when you remove just the right things in just the right way, something good happens."

Have you tried this approach? We'd love to hear what you're giving up in 2014, and what you're making more room to do! Leave us a comment or join the conversation on Twitter.

Using Sustainability to Avoid Risk

The SSC Team August 25, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this blog from the SSC archives: The evidence that sustainability can be good for business is overwhelming. Most of the case studies, examples, and analysis that has been done show positive links between a sustainable approach to environmental and social issues, and corporate profits, Thus far, the research has been primarily focused on direct operational efficiencies (like retrofitting your office lighting to save money and reduce your carbon footprint), innovation (using biomimicry to drive new product development), and productivity (ie. more engaged employees take less sick leave). However, there hasn't been as much talk about the nexus between sustainability and risk management. And for corporations operating in complex supply chains in a globally-connected economy -- well -- effective risk management can be the difference between success and failure. Below, we take a look at three articles that shed light on why companies still struggle to incorporate sustainability into their risk management practices (and vice versa).

Has sustainability become a risky business? 

This GreenBiz article by John Davies reviews a report by Ernst & Young. The key takeaway: While more companies are concerned about increased risk and the proximity of natural resource shortages, corporate risk response appears to be inadequate to address the scope and scale of some of these challenges. The free report looks at six corporate sustainability trends with a strong focus on the internal influencers of corporate performance (CEOs and boards), as well as external forces ranging from governments to shareholders and investors.

Playing It Safe Is Riskier than You Think

This article by Bill Taylor in the Harvard Business Review makes the case that "difficult and uncertain times are often the best times for organizations to separate themselves from the pack, so long as their leaders are prepared not to stand pat." While not directly about sustainability, this article certainly supports the notion that economic turmoil is no reason not to be ambitious about tackling big sustainability challenges.

Research: Why Companies Keep Getting Blind-Sided by Risk

by Mary Driscoll in the Harvard Business Review presents fascinating insight into why companies (and their executives) are not succeeding at identifying and mitigating risk. Survey findings indicate that most organizations’ leaders did indeed express concern about the impact of political turmoil, natural disasters, or extreme weather. But the findings also show that the people at the front lines of the business were hamstrung by a lack of visibility into risk. Nearly half said they lacked the resources needed to adequately assess business continuity programs at supplier sites. Many relied on the suppliers filling out perfunctory, unreliable checklists. There are some big lessons here for sustainability practitioners! Are simple mistakes holding back your sustainability? Find out how to correct those mistakes here!

Using Sustainability to Avoid Risk

The SSC Team August 25, 2015 Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this blog from the SSC archives:

The evidence that sustainability can be good for business is overwhelming. Most of the case studies, examples, and analysis that has been done show positive links between a sustainable approach to environmental and social issues, and corporate profits, Thus far, the research has been primarily focused on direct operational efficiencies (like retrofitting your office lighting to save money and reduce your carbon footprint), innovation (using biomimicry to drive new product development), and productivity (ie. more engaged employees take less sick leave).

However, there hasn't been as much talk about the nexus between sustainability and risk management. And for corporations operating in complex supply chains in a globally-connected economy -- well -- effective risk management can be the difference between success and failure. Below, we take a look at three articles that shed light on why companies still struggle to incorporate sustainability into their risk management practices (and vice versa).

Has sustainability become a risky business? 

This GreenBiz article by John Davies reviews a report by Ernst & Young. The key takeaway: While more companies are concerned about increased risk and the proximity of natural resource shortages, corporate risk response appears to be inadequate to address the scope and scale of some of these challenges. The free report looks at six corporate sustainability trends with a strong focus on the internal influencers of corporate performance (CEOs and boards), as well as external forces ranging from governments to shareholders and investors.

Playing It Safe Is Riskier than You Think 

This article by Bill Taylor in the Harvard Business Review makes the case that "difficult and uncertain times are often the best times for organizations to separate themselves from the pack, so long as their leaders are prepared not to stand pat." While not directly about sustainability, this article certainly supports the notion that economic turmoil is no reason not to be ambitious about tackling big sustainability challenges.

Research: Why Companies Keep Getting Blind-Sided by Risk 

by Mary Driscoll in the Harvard Business Review presents fascinating insight into why companies (and their executives) are not succeeding at identifying and mitigating risk. Survey findings indicate that most organizations’ leaders did indeed express concern about the impact of political turmoil, natural disasters, or extreme weather. But the findings also show that the people at the front lines of the business were hamstrung by a lack of visibility into risk. Nearly half said they lacked the resources needed to adequately assess business continuity programs at supplier sites. Many relied on the suppliers filling out perfunctory, unreliable checklists. There are some big lessons here for sustainability practitioners! 

Are simple mistakes holding back your sustainability? Find out how to correct those mistakes here!

Data Management Concepts for Sustainability, Pt. 4

The SSC Team August 20, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
This article was written as an expansion of our white paper “Choosing Sustainability Management Software for your Business” published in July 2011.  If you’re looking for information on how to make your software selection, check out the full article.  If you just want to make sense of this particular topic, keep reading.  Whether you like this article or not, we want to hear from YOU so that we can continue to provide the best insight for YOU, our readers…  Our series on Sustainability Software continues with “Data Management Concepts for Sustainability”.  In this article (Part 4 of 4), we’ll complete the introduction and definition of key Data Management terms (read Part 3 here).  Our end goal with this series is to enable YOU, as the Business Leader, to feel more comfortable in a technical discussion related to the various areas of Data Management, especially as related to the care and feeding of Sustainability Software packages. Being able to “talk the talk” is the best defense in the technology wilderness.  Just remember, at the basis of any technical term is a common sense business notion, and staying grounded to this notion will help keep your conversations from drifting astray.

Data Integration

Data Integration is one of the most difficult of the activities covered in this series because it involves most of the different activities working in concert with each other.  For example, it is implicit in Data Movement between systems where the Data models are different.  Suppose we have data in our Accounting system that will be used in a cost calculation algorithm (method) in our Sustainability Software.  To do this, we need to copy the Accounting data, then reshape it to conform to the load utilities for our package and proceed with the load.  This setup entails numerous subtleties including the cross referencing of the source data model in the Accounting System with the format of the import utility.  This is called Field Mapping and it’s not just an easy matching question where you can get the first few right and guess the rest.  Examples will help us here.
  • Suppose we need to deal with quantity shipment data and the target model is asking for unit prices and volumes.  We might need to deduce the carbon content per gallon from the available carbon content per fifty five gallon barrel, or just divide by 55.
  • A more complex example involves translation from the English System to the Metric System (raise your hand if you can do this without a calculator).
  • Another example would be the rules concerning the potential for rounding errors for large quantities.
  • A final classic example is how to deal with Asian names (commonly listed with the surname first) being transferred into a system with a European paradigm (where the surname is listed last).
Data Integration is expensive to build and more expensive to operate.  SaaS is a way to avoid the Integration Tax to the extent possible since it has already been built into many of the downstream systems you’ll be using.

Data Mining

Data Mining is the last major topic to be introduced.  It also involves smatterings of the others, but has a unique ad-hoc character at its essence. Suppose we have a database that describes product production events in a manufacturing setting.  Suppose also that we wish to learn more about root causes of some recurring problem that has escaped previous attempts to solve it and choose to “look at all the occurrences at once”.  Someone who is expert in the data itself, as well as all the business processes it describes could attempt to construct queries that will reveal common conditions that led to the problem occurrences.  For example, he might notice they all tend to fall in the first half hour of their respective production runs.  Further drill down might reveal they all involve late shipments from the same raw material vendor, while production runs with timely shipments from the same vendor seem to go without mishap.  This would lead us to suspect potential spoilage or lack of maturity in the late arriving material.  Data Mining is a spiral learning discipline.  One spirals in to a common cause, or spirals out to learn the nature of the Cosmos.

Conclusion

We hope that as a result of this information, albeit somewhat high-level, you’ll find a greater degree of ease in approaching Data Management problems and their solutions with any Sustainability Software package that you may be considering.   As with the rest of this series, our goal is to guide you through each of these complex topics and bring them safely toward a solution that will provide you with robust and accurate data and data management practices that will last for years to come. Now that you’ve read this article, tell us what you think!  And be sure to check out the full white paper.

Data Management Concepts for Sustainability – Part 4

The SSC Team August 20, 2015 Tags: , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

This article was written as an expansion of our white paper “Choosing Sustainability Management Software for your Business” published in July 2011.  If you’re looking for information on how to make your software selection, check out the full article.  If you just want to make sense of this particular topic, keep reading.  Whether you like this article or not, we want to hear from YOU so that we can continue to provide the best insight for YOU, our readers… 

Our series on Sustainability Software continues with “Data Management Concepts for Sustainability”.  In this article (Part 4 of 4), we’ll complete the introduction and definition of key Data Management terms (read Part 3 here).  Our end goal with this series is to enable YOU, as the Business Leader, to feel more comfortable in a technical discussion related to the various areas of Data Management, especially as related to the care and feeding of Sustainability Software packages. Being able to “talk the talk” is the best defense in the technology wilderness.  Just remember, at the basis of any technical term is a common sense business notion, and staying grounded to this notion will help keep your conversations from drifting astray.

Data Integration

Data Integration is one of the most difficult of the activities covered in this series because it involves most of the different activities working in concert with each other.  For example, it is implicit in Data Movement between systems where the Data models are different.  Suppose we have data in our Accounting system that will be used in a cost calculation algorithm (method) in our Sustainability Software.  To do this, we need to copy the Accounting data, then reshape it to conform to the load utilities for our package and proceed with the load.  This setup entails numerous subtleties including the cross referencing of the source data model in the Accounting System with the format of the import utility.  This is called Field Mapping and it’s not just an easy matching question where you can get the first few right and guess the rest.  Examples will help us here.

  • Suppose we need to deal with quantity shipment data and the target model is asking for unit prices and volumes.  We might need to deduce the carbon content per gallon from the available carbon content per fifty five gallon barrel, or just divide by 55. 
  • A more complex example involves translation from the English System to the Metric System (raise your hand if you can do this without a calculator).
  • Another example would be the rules concerning the potential for rounding errors for large quantities.
  • A final classic example is how to deal with Asian names (commonly listed with the surname first) being transferred into a system with a European paradigm (where the surname is listed last).

Data Integration is expensive to build and more expensive to operate.  SaaS is a way to avoid the Integration Tax to the extent possible since it has already been built into many of the downstream systems you’ll be using.

Data Mining

Data Mining is the last major topic to be introduced.  It also involves smatterings of the others, but has a unique ad-hoc character at its essence.  

Suppose we have a database that describes product production events in a manufacturing setting.  Suppose also that we wish to learn more about root causes of some recurring problem that has escaped previous attempts to solve it and choose to “look at all the occurrences at once”.  Someone who is expert in the data itself, as well as all the business processes it describes could attempt to construct queries that will reveal common conditions that led to the problem occurrences.  For example, he might notice they all tend to fall in the first half hour of their respective production runs.  Further drill down might reveal they all involve late shipments from the same raw material vendor, while production runs with timely shipments from the same vendor seem to go without mishap.  This would lead us to suspect potential spoilage or lack of maturity in the late arriving material.  Data Mining is a spiral learning discipline.  One spirals in to a common cause, or spirals out to learn the nature of the Cosmos. 

Conclusion

We hope that as a result of this information, albeit somewhat high-level, you’ll find a greater degree of ease in approaching Data Management problems and their solutions with any Sustainability Software package that you may be considering.   As with the rest of this series, our goal is to guide you through each of these complex topics and bring them safely toward a solution that will provide you with robust and accurate data and data management practices that will last for years to come. 

Now that you’ve read this article, tell us what you think!  And be sure to check out the full white paper.

Data Management Concepts for Sustainability, Pt. 3

The SSC Team August 18, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
This article was written as an expansion of our white paper “Choosing Sustainability Management Software for your Business” published in July 2011.  If you’re looking for information on how to make your software selection, check out the full article.  If you just want to make sense of this particular topic, keep reading.  Whether you like this article or not, we want to hear from YOU so that we can continue to provide the best insight for YOU, our readers…   Our series on Sustainability Software continues with “Data Management Concepts for Sustainability”.  In this article (Part 3 of 4), we’ll continue introducing and defining key Data Management terms (read Part 2 here).  Our end goal with this series is to enable YOU, as the Business Leader, to feel more comfortable in a technical discussion related to the various areas of Data Management, especially as related to the care and feeding of Sustainability Software packages. Being able to “talk the talk” is the best defense in the technology wilderness.  Just remember, at the basis of any technical term is a common sense business notion, and staying grounded to this notion will help keep your conversations from drifting astray.

Data Movement

Data Movement is one of the silent cost areas of Data Management.  This entails the replication of data into a system and then out of it on to another system.  For example, suppose you have selected the ideal Sustainability Software offered in a SaaS-based contract by a reputable vendor.  A qualified consultant is hired to mastermind the installation and the ideal algorithms are determined, tested and approved.  All we need now is to move the company transaction data into it and let it do its work to produce the outputs we desire.  What can be so hard about that? Strong vendors of Sustainability Software will provide robust utilities to import data into their system and to export data from it.  These must receive special attention from your Consultant and from your IT staff who will need to know how they work, at least for diagnostic scenarios. We list some additional considerations below.

Data In

Suppose your consultant determines your current operational control systems can supply the data your new Sustainability Software needs and a prototype has proven this to everyone’s satisfaction.  It seems like all we need to do is to rerun the prototype code every day and everything will work. Axiom of Design:  Everything needs to be designed at least three times: Once to see if we even really want what we had in mind, once more to learn how to build the ongoing system, and once more to really build what we imagined.  Then Continuous Improvement kicks in. You are in the process of building what is called a Data Movement Application.  Any process that is repeated will fail often in new ways not anticipated.  Yes, computers can break and humans make mistakes frequently, but tornadoes and blizzards happen too. We want repeating processes to repeat as planned, and this is why the first design of any software will be replaced.  Moreover, you are probably required to prove to an auditor that all your data is being transmitted and received with very few errors that are themselves being analyzed and accounted for.  This is motivation for an Automated Balance and Control system that manages your Data Movement and assures its accuracy and timeliness.  If you intend all the work to be “outsourced”, be sure to consider these factors in your negotiations.  At minimum, be prepared to self-ensure for these events—they will happen.

Data Out

There are two main reasons to move data out of your Sustainability Software.
  1. To provide a report for approved readers
  2. To supply calculated data to another system
Reporting is technically “easy” now with all the Business Intelligence platforms that are available.  Vendors include Microsoft, Oracle, IBM and many others.  These tools are expensive but would be cost effective for SaaS providers because they can scale to serve many end users.  They are being enhanced daily to also support information display on tablets and smart phones, so you can digest this information over the Internet from nearly any place in the world. Data transfer to another system, however can be a different story.  This will be a Data Movement Application and all the considerations we’ve raised above apply here as well, except your system is now the supplier of data and another system is the recipient.  The complexities arise not only from engineering for repeatability, but from the likely need to translate source data so the target system can receive and interpret it appropriately. (TO BE CONTINUED…)  Now that you’ve read this article, tell us what you think!  And be sure to check out the full white paper.

Data Management Concepts for Sustainability – Part 3

The SSC Team August 18, 2015 Tags: , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

This article was written as an expansion of our white paper “Choosing Sustainability Management Software for your Business” published in July 2011.  If you’re looking for information on how to make your software selection, check out the full article.  If you just want to make sense of this particular topic, keep reading.  Whether you like this article or not, we want to hear from YOU so that we can continue to provide the best insight for YOU, our readers…  

Our series on Sustainability Software continues with “Data Management Concepts for Sustainability”.  In this article (Part 3 of 4), we’ll continue introducing and defining key Data Management terms (read Part 2 here).  Our end goal with this series is to enable YOU, as the Business Leader, to feel more comfortable in a technical discussion related to the various areas of Data Management, especially as related to the care and feeding of Sustainability Software packages. Being able to “talk the talk” is the best defense in the technology wilderness.  Just remember, at the basis of any technical term is a common sense business notion, and staying grounded to this notion will help keep your conversations from drifting astray.

Data Movement

Data Movement is one of the silent cost areas of Data Management.  This entails the replication of data into a system and then out of it on to another system.  For example, suppose you have selected the ideal Sustainability Software offered in a SaaS-based contract by a reputable vendor.  A qualified consultant is hired to mastermind the installation and the ideal algorithms are determined, tested and approved.  All we need now is to move the company transaction data into it and let it do its work to produce the outputs we desire.  What can be so hard about that?

Strong vendors of Sustainability Software will provide robust utilities to import data into their system and to export data from it.  These must receive special attention from your Consultant and from your IT staff who will need to know how they work, at least for diagnostic scenarios.

We list some additional considerations below.

Data In

Suppose your consultant determines your current operational control systems can supply the data your new Sustainability Software needs and a prototype has proven this to everyone’s satisfaction.  It seems like all we need to do is to rerun the prototype code every day and everything will work.

Axiom of Design:  Everything needs to be designed at least three times: Once to see if we even really want what we had in mind, once more to learn how to build the ongoing system, and once more to really build what we imagined.  Then Continuous Improvement kicks in.

You are in the process of building what is called a Data Movement Application.  Any process that is repeated will fail often in new ways not anticipated.  Yes, computers can break and humans make mistakes frequently, but tornadoes and blizzards happen too. We want repeating processes to repeat as planned, and this is why the first design of any software will be replaced.  Moreover, you are probably required to prove to an auditor that all your data is being transmitted and received with very few errors that are themselves being analyzed and accounted for.  This is motivation for an Automated Balance and Control system that manages your Data Movement and assures its accuracy and timeliness.  If you intend all the work to be “outsourced”, be sure to consider these factors in your negotiations.  At minimum, be prepared to self-ensure for these events—they will happen.

Data Out

There are two main reasons to move data out of your Sustainability Software.

  1. To provide a report for approved readers
  2. To supply calculated data to another system

Reporting is technically “easy” now with all the Business Intelligence platforms that are available.  Vendors include Microsoft, Oracle, IBM and many others.  These tools are expensive but would be cost effective for SaaS providers because they can scale to serve many end users.  They are being enhanced daily to also support information display on tablets and smart phones, so you can digest this information over the Internet from nearly any place in the world.

Data transfer to another system, however can be a different story.  This will be a Data Movement Application and all the considerations we’ve raised above apply here as well, except your system is now the supplier of data and another system is the recipient.  The complexities arise not only from engineering for repeatability, but from the likely need to translate source data so the target system can receive and interpret it appropriately.  

(TO BE CONTINUED…) 

Now that you’ve read this article, tell us what you think!  And be sure to check out the full white paper.

Featured AGPOM Member – The NoMad Hotel

Tara Hughes August 17, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , Industry News No comments
The nomad hotel

The NoMad Hotel, NYC, LEED Gold Certified

This fabulous eco-luxury hotel was the first renovated hotel in New York City to obtain LEED Gold Certification and was one of NYC’s three hotel properties with top LEED credentials upon certification in 2013.

leed-goldThe hotel’s standout green features that contributed toward the awarding of LEED Gold are:

  • Occupancy sensors for lighting and HVAC in hotel rooms to reduce energy when rooms are unoccupied
  • Sustainable reuse of the existing building’s exterior walls and floors
  • Reclaimed wood flooring in the guestrooms
  • High efficiency windows and HVAC equipment
  • Water loop heat pumps that condition the rooms
  • Dual-flush toilets in guest bathrooms
  • A green roof and outdoor space that contribute to a high ratio of open space to development footprint
  • Implementation of a Green Operations and Maintenance Plan to reduce toxins and chemicals introduced into the building after completion

In addition, the Hotel is implementing many of AGPOM’s Green Behavioral Plan for Hotels and Resorts.  The following provides an example of their commitment:

  • Reusable linen program for guests to reuse towels and linens during their stay
  • Relying on natural daylight in restaurants and common areas for as much of each day as possible
  • Keep window coverings closed in unoccupied guest rooms to combat extreme temps
  • Incandescent light bulbs have been replaced with CFLs
  • Recycling programs are used and encouraged
  • Purchases locally, when possible
  • Un-used and/or no longer used items are donated to charities

nomad logoFor more information on the NoMad Hotel visit their website: www.nomadhotel.com