Strategic Sustainability Consulting

Strategic Sustainability Consulting

Best Practices for Virtual Teams

The SSC Team June 16, 2016 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the SSC archives. 

A growing number of companies allow employees to work from home some or all of the time. That's great for many reasons (less time spent in traffic, lower commuting emissions, happier workforce!), but also presents challenges. Today, we're inspired by three articles on how to create, manage, and inspire the best virtual teams. Enjoy!

Tips for Transitioning an Office-Based Company to Remote Work: This Fast Company article includes an interview with an organization that recently went virtual (4 days a week) and 10 tips for companies considering a similar move. (Our favorite is #7!)

How to Be a Family-Friendly Boss: This Harvard Business Review article is focused on ways that bosses can help staff be great employees and great parents. Not surprisingly, allowing some form of virtual work, or telecommuting, is high on the list of recommendations. Our favorite part about this piece is the discussion about how to measure job performance.

How Virtual Teams Can Create Human Connections Despite Distance: This Harvard Business Review article provides great ideas for developing and maintaining highly effective teams when members are in different offices around the world (or just working from home a couple miles away). 

Curious about the environmental benefits of commuting (and how much telecommuting can help)? Download our free white paper, Reducing Your Organization's Carbon Footprint: Addressing Commuter-Related Emissions to learn more about it!

Best Practices for Virtual Teams

The SSC Team June 16, 2016 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the SSC archives. 

A growing number of companies allow employees to work from home some or all of the time. That's great for many reasons (less time spent in traffic, lower commuting emissions, happier workforce!), but also presents challenges. Today, we're inspired by three articles on how to create, manage, and inspire the best virtual teams. Enjoy!

Tips for Transitioning an Office-Based Company to Remote Work: This Fast Company article includes an interview with an organization that recently went virtual (4 days a week) and 10 tips for companies considering a similar move. (Our favorite is #7!)

How to Be a Family-Friendly Boss: This Harvard Business Review article is focused on ways that bosses can help staff be great employees and great parents. Not surprisingly, allowing some form of virtual work, or telecommuting, is high on the list of recommendations. Our favorite part about this piece is the discussion about how to measure job performance.

How Virtual Teams Can Create Human Connections Despite Distance: This Harvard Business Review article provides great ideas for developing and maintaining highly effective teams when members are in different offices around the world (or just working from home a couple miles away). 

Curious about the environmental benefits of commuting (and how much telecommuting can help)? Download our free white paper, Reducing Your Organization's Carbon Footprint: Addressing Commuter-Related Emissions to learn more about it!

Free Learning Resources for Aspiring Sustainability Professionals

The SSC Team June 14, 2016 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Sustainability consulting is about so much more than caring about mitigating the effects of climate change. We often hear about the passion and energy aspiring consultants hope to bring to the field, but what a good consultant really needs is business knowledge, a solid understanding of the sustainability field, consulting skills, and change management skills.

Of course, growing into the role is part of the process of developing into a senior consultant. And growing requires learning.

If you have a solid background in business or consulting, maybe you need to focus on your sustainability knowledge. If you are a science and data expert, maybe you need to brush up on your strategic management and leadership skills.

Whatever your skill gap is, whatever your job status is, whatever your goals are, you should always set aside some time to learn something new.

We came across this ridiculously good article from Inc. featuring 21 awesome places to learn skills online, and we highlighted a few good ones to illustrate how easy it is to brush up on key sustainability and consulting skills for free.

 Go forth and learn.

  • MIT OpenCourseWare – MIT has offered courseware, learning resources, and syllabi up online for free for a number of years now. Review lecture notes, find the best textbooks, follow along with lab demos on courses ranging from climate studies, change management, leadership, and sustainability policy.
  • Boundless – A company shaping the way textbooks are written and sold, Boundless offers great overview information on dozens of topics to help students quickly understand the basics of any field. From accounting to biology to business, Boundless is a solid place to brush up on a topic you don’t need to know tons of detail about.
  • UReddit – Reddit surprises with some really interesting courses on things that you might not be able to find anywhere else online. Think “Advanced training on Microsoft Excel” or “Starting your own business.”
  • Future Learn – A private company owned by The Open University offering free coursework from professionals in the UK and partners around the world.
  • Free course: Make an Impact: Sustainability for Professionals. Find out how to integrate a sustainable development strategy into your company with this free online course. University of Bath.
  • Supply Chain Innovation: How Technology Can Create a Sustainable Future. University of Twente.

Once you’ve built your foundational knowledge, come back and get certified as a green auditor or connect with our CEO for personal job coaching based on your newly developed skills.

Free Learning Resources for Aspiring Sustainability Professionals

The SSC Team June 14, 2016 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Sustainability consulting is about so much more than caring about mitigating the effects of climate change. We often hear about the passion and energy aspiring consultants hope to bring to the field, but what a good consultant really needs is business knowledge, a solid understanding of the sustainability field, consulting skills, and change management skills.

Of course, growing into the role is part of the process of developing into a senior consultant. And growing requires learning.

If you have a solid background in business or consulting, maybe you need to focus on your sustainability knowledge. If you are a science and data expert, maybe you need to brush up on your strategic management and leadership skills.

Whatever your skill gap is, whatever your job status is, whatever your goals are, you should always set aside some time to learn something new.

We came across this ridiculously good article from Inc. featuring 21 awesome places to learn skills online, and we highlighted a few good ones to illustrate how easy it is to brush up on key sustainability and consulting skills for free.

 Go forth and learn.

  • MIT OpenCourseWare – MIT has offered courseware, learning resources, and syllabi up online for free for a number of years now. Review lecture notes, find the best textbooks, follow along with lab demos on courses ranging from climate studies, change management, leadership, and sustainability policy.
  • Boundless – A company shaping the way textbooks are written and sold, Boundless offers great overview information on dozens of topics to help students quickly understand the basics of any field. From accounting to biology to business, Boundless is a solid place to brush up on a topic you don’t need to know tons of detail about.
  • UReddit – Reddit surprises with some really interesting courses on things that you might not be able to find anywhere else online. Think “Advanced training on Microsoft Excel” or “Starting your own business.”
  • Future Learn – A private company owned by The Open University offering free coursework from professionals in the UK and partners around the world.
  • Free course: Make an Impact: Sustainability for Professionals. Find out how to integrate a sustainable development strategy into your company with this free online course. University of Bath.
  • Supply Chain Innovation: How Technology Can Create a Sustainable Future. University of Twente.

Once you’ve built your foundational knowledge, come back and get certified as a green auditor or connect with our CEO for personal job coaching based on your newly developed skills.

TED Talks Sustainability: Michael Metcalfe: Financing the Fight Against Climate Change

The SSC Team June 9, 2016 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Nothing inspires us like a good TED talk, and here’s one of our favorites. Enjoy it!

About the speaker: Michael Metcalfe is not a climate change expert, he’s a senior managing director and head of global macro strategy at a leading financial firm, State Street Global markets. Metcalfe’s team helps clients make smart investment decisions, not “green” decisions, so his take on financing the fight against climate change is worth a listen.  

About the talk: In 2008, following the global financial crisis, governments across the world issued an unprecedented $250 billion worth of international currency to stop the collapse of the world’s biggest banks, and save the global economy. In this TED talk, financial expert Michael Metcalfe suggests that we can follow the same unconventional steps to fund the fight against climate change and build a global commitment to a green future.

 

TED Talks Sustainability: Michael Metcalfe: Financing the Fight Against Climate Change

The SSC Team June 9, 2016 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Nothing inspires us like a good TED talk, and here’s one of our favorites. Enjoy it!

About the speaker: Michael Metcalfe is not a climate change expert, he’s a senior managing director and head of global macro strategy at a leading financial firm, State Street Global markets. Metcalfe’s team helps clients make smart investment decisions, not “green” decisions, so his take on financing the fight against climate change is worth a listen.  

About the talk: In 2008, following the global financial crisis, governments across the world issued an unprecedented $250 billion worth of international currency to stop the collapse of the world’s biggest banks, and save the global economy. In this TED talk, financial expert Michael Metcalfe suggests that we can follow the same unconventional steps to fund the fight against climate change and build a global commitment to a green future.

 

Can You Attract Low-Carbon-Focused Clients and Investors?

The SSC Team June 7, 2016 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

From the Fortune 500 to retail investors, corporations and individuals are looking to fund green companies and projects. Additionally, B2B companies are increasingly setting sustainability thresholds for suppliers. 

You can make your company attractive to the low-carbon marketplace in a number of ways:

Start reporting: One of the simplest ways to start on the path of attracting the green investment community is to clearly communicate your sustainability efforts and their results. If you aren’t generating a transparent, comprehensive sustainability report, then you are communicating that you do not and have not acknowledged your impact or risk in the face of climate change. By simply reporting on sustainability metrics, you are communicating that your organization is “on it.”

Seek certifications: Look to third-party certifications, in your industry or in a wider industry role, to begin building a validated sustainability strategy that follows best practices. From B-Corp certification to Energy Star (for electronics and appliances) to LEED to ….there are dozens of certifications that signal that your company is serious about following accepted sustainability standards.

Get on “a list:” There are a number of index funds put together based on corporate qualifications and certifications, or you can be added to a green stock listing. Of course, your sustainability efforts or products must be robust to qualify.

Issue green bonds: Starbucks recently made the news for issuing $500 billion in green bonds to fund its sustainability programs. Offering green bonds to investors to fund your sustainability efforts can serve two purposes: generate capital to fund larger-scale sustainability efforts and signal that you’re serious about the investment in the program.

Are you looking to improve your supplier scorecard performance and attract more green business? We have experience with dozens of supplier scorecard metrics and reporting standards to help open doors for your company.

 

Can You Attract Low-Carbon-Focused Clients and Investors?

The SSC Team June 7, 2016 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

From the Fortune 500 to retail investors, corporations and individuals are looking to fund green companies and projects. Additionally, B2B companies are increasingly setting sustainability thresholds for suppliers. 

You can make your company attractive to the low-carbon marketplace in a number of ways:

Start reporting: One of the simplest ways to start on the path of attracting the green investment community is to clearly communicate your sustainability efforts and their results. If you aren’t generating a transparent, comprehensive sustainability report, then you are communicating that you do not and have not acknowledged your impact or risk in the face of climate change. By simply reporting on sustainability metrics, you are communicating that your organization is “on it.”

Seek certifications: Look to third-party certifications, in your industry or in a wider industry role, to begin building a validated sustainability strategy that follows best practices. From B-Corp certification to Energy Star (for electronics and appliances) to LEED to ….there are dozens of certifications that signal that your company is serious about following accepted sustainability standards.

Get on “a list:” There are a number of index funds put together based on corporate qualifications and certifications, or you can be added to a green stock listing. Of course, your sustainability efforts or products must be robust to qualify.

Issue green bonds: Starbucks recently made the news for issuing $500 billion in green bonds to fund its sustainability programs. Offering green bonds to investors to fund your sustainability efforts can serve two purposes: generate capital to fund larger-scale sustainability efforts and signal that you’re serious about the investment in the program.

Are you looking to improve your supplier scorecard performance and attract more green business? We have experience with dozens of supplier scorecard metrics and reporting standards to help open doors for your company.

 

Closing the Gap Between Sustainability Strategy and Execution

The SSC Team June 2, 2016 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the SSC archives. 

The implication is obvious — strategists and executors must work together better to bridge these two worlds. It's common sense. Unfortunately, it's far from common practice. What typically happens is an awkward hand-off between the two. In the worst cases the strategists adopt an elitist, disconnected mindset: We're the idea people, someone else will make it happen. They don't bother to truly understand what it takes to implement the ideas. They don't engage the executors early and ask, "How will this actually work?" The executors contribute to the trouble as well. Often they don't truly understand the thinking behind the strategy. They take it at face value and don't ask enough tough questions.

-- Doug Sundheim, Harvard Business Review

We've been reading a long list of awesome leadership articles lately--and this one, Closing the Chasm Between Strategy and Execution  is one that we keep coming back to. Why? Because one of the biggest challenges in sustainability consulting is helping client jump from developing a sustainability strategy to actually implementing the plan.

We highly recommend that you read the whole article (and the comments--many of which highlight additional angles to the problem), but we'd like to solely focus on the qualities of great strategists and executors. (And in many cases, the same person is playing both sides of the field, so he or she needs to think about the full list!)

THE BEST SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGISTS BELIEVE:

  • If I can't see and articulate how we're actually going to make this strategy work, it probably won't work. 
  • While it's painful to integrate execution planning into my strategizing, it's even more painful to watch my strategies fail. 
  • Sounding smart is overrated. Doing smart is where the real value lies. 
  • I'm just as responsible for strong execution as the executor is. 

THE BEST SUSTAINABILITY EXECUTORS BELIEVE: 

  • I need to be involved in the strategy process early -- even if that means I have to artfully push my way into it. 
  • I need to be perceived as relevant and valuable to the strategy process. 
  • I need to know the "whys" behind the strategy. 
  • I'm just as responsible for strong strategy as the strategist is 

If you're stuck somewhere between sustainability strategy and implementation, consider which of these beliefs aren't rock solid within your team. And start shoring them up--because otherwise, everyone will become dissatisfied. 

A final parting thought from Sundheim: You can see a clear thread of responsibility running throughout all the beliefs above. Not responsibility for a given task, but rather responsibility for the not-given tasks — the messy spots in the middle where it's not clear who should own something. The best strategists, executors, and leaders stand up and say, "I'm responsible for it" even if it isn't in their job description. It's doubly powerful when both strategists and executors do this, meeting in the middle. That's true collaborative leadership. When these spots go unwatched, un-owned, and unaddressed, they bring down projects and eventually whole companies. 

If you liked this article, sign up for our monthly e-newsletter, where we curate the best insight about sustainability leadership, change management, and employee engagement.

Closing the Gap Between Sustainability Strategy and Execution

The SSC Team June 2, 2016 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the SSC archives. 

The implication is obvious — strategists and executors must work together better to bridge these two worlds. It's common sense. Unfortunately, it's far from common practice. What typically happens is an awkward hand-off between the two. In the worst cases the strategists adopt an elitist, disconnected mindset: We're the idea people, someone else will make it happen. They don't bother to truly understand what it takes to implement the ideas. They don't engage the executors early and ask, "How will this actually work?" The executors contribute to the trouble as well. Often they don't truly understand the thinking behind the strategy. They take it at face value and don't ask enough tough questions.

-- Doug Sundheim, Harvard Business Review

We've been reading a long list of awesome leadership articles lately--and this one, Closing the Chasm Between Strategy and Execution  is one that we keep coming back to. Why? Because one of the biggest challenges in sustainability consulting is helping client jump from developing a sustainability strategy to actually implementing the plan.

We highly recommend that you read the whole article (and the comments--many of which highlight additional angles to the problem), but we'd like to solely focus on the qualities of great strategists and executors. (And in many cases, the same person is playing both sides of the field, so he or she needs to think about the full list!)

THE BEST SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGISTS BELIEVE:

  • If I can't see and articulate how we're actually going to make this strategy work, it probably won't work. 
  • While it's painful to integrate execution planning into my strategizing, it's even more painful to watch my strategies fail. 
  • Sounding smart is overrated. Doing smart is where the real value lies. 
  • I'm just as responsible for strong execution as the executor is. 

THE BEST SUSTAINABILITY EXECUTORS BELIEVE: 

  • I need to be involved in the strategy process early -- even if that means I have to artfully push my way into it. 
  • I need to be perceived as relevant and valuable to the strategy process. 
  • I need to know the "whys" behind the strategy. 
  • I'm just as responsible for strong strategy as the strategist is 

If you're stuck somewhere between sustainability strategy and implementation, consider which of these beliefs aren't rock solid within your team. And start shoring them up--because otherwise, everyone will become dissatisfied. 

A final parting thought from Sundheim: You can see a clear thread of responsibility running throughout all the beliefs above. Not responsibility for a given task, but rather responsibility for the not-given tasks — the messy spots in the middle where it's not clear who should own something. The best strategists, executors, and leaders stand up and say, "I'm responsible for it" even if it isn't in their job description. It's doubly powerful when both strategists and executors do this, meeting in the middle. That's true collaborative leadership. When these spots go unwatched, un-owned, and unaddressed, they bring down projects and eventually whole companies. 

If you liked this article, sign up for our monthly e-newsletter, where we curate the best insight about sustainability leadership, change management, and employee engagement.