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What does gender equality have to do with climate change?

The SSC Team January 10, 2017 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Trick question. 

We believe strongly in the concept of sustainability in terms of both the environmental AND social impacts of an organization's operational practice.

Often we find that these two concepts are less of a dichotomy and more of a series of interconnected pieces where human factors and environmental factors blend and create causes and effects that may not have been previously expected. 

So, as we engage in carbon footprint calculations and LCA's, we also encourage our clients to look at their sustainability strategy holistically. 

Gender equality has a strong business case, is right for developing nations as well as advanced economies, and can improve retention and productivity. As human factors are taken into consideration alongside environmental ones, the entire global economic, social, and natural "ecosystems" will be positively impacted. 

As your company looks to boost gender equality, check out this practical guide to putting gender on the agenda.

By using the GRI standards for sustainability reporting, companies will be able to include a full set of data as it relates to environmental and social impact, including things like gender equality. If you're ready to talk sustainability reporting, now's the time! Contact us today. 

 

Lobbying Isn’t (Always) a Dirty Word: Climate Change is a Very Special Interest

The SSC Team November 3, 2016 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

The public discourse, especially in the current political climate, tends to take extreme positions on practically every issue. Of course climate change and climate change regulation is already quite a hot-button, but the act of lobbying itself – approaching elected officials to influence public policy – is often considered dirty politics.

In truth, those of us committed to smart regulations and international cooperation to help reduce the effects of climate change, can benefit from pressing our elected officials to take this issue seriously. U.S. voters head to the polls next week – make sure you know what your candidates’ views are on climate change – and organizations small and large should consider taking a stronger position and using their resources to help create a smart regulatory environment.

The deck isn’t stacked against the green companies

According to a recent study, more than $3.1 billion was spent lobbying on environmental issues between 2009 and 2014, and nearly half of that money was spent by firms lobbying for climate-protecting regulation.

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) “openly supported a cap-and-trade system for carbon emissions, and even left the U.S. Chamber of Commerce over the organization’s vociferous opposition to carbon regulation,” and was the second highest spender lobbying on climate change in 2008.

Too few are using the government to help

The study also found that mostly the activist companies – very low emitters with a competitive advantage from increasing regulation – and the worst greenhouse gas emitters (gas, oil, coal, and the like) are primarily the ones taking the fight to state and national legislators. This means that there are hundreds of thousands of organizations that aren’t speaking up at all, allowing the major players to dictate the terms.

Integrate lobbying into your sustainability strategy

As companies develop sustainability strategies, be sure to include lobbying – at the local, regional, or national level –  in that strategy. Set the pace as a leader on the issues so you’re not caught playing catch up when legislation is enacted.

Is your organization integrating lobbying and outreach efforts into its sustainability strategy? Let us know where you've seen gains.

Consider an employee-driven sustainability effort, but weigh cost and benefit

The SSC Team October 18, 2016 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Building effective green teams, motivating employees, channeling creativity and harnessing energy among employees can be difficult during the implementation of a sustainability program that pushes employees to change behavior.

Recently, an article published by CH2M provided an excellent series of “steps” for sustainability managers to consider when pushing for distributive leadership in the sustainability area – creating a strong program that is employee-driven versus manager-driven.

The steps are centered on the company’s efforts to match the company’s material goals with the employees’ material goals and then encourage the employees to “run with it.”

CH2M’s list of steps is an excellent resource for those organizations with the flexibility and opportunity to engage employees in specific ways that empower employees and align their efforts with corporate sustainability goals.

However, when strategically allocating sustainability resources, it is important to weigh the cost benefit of any and all sustainability activities with regard to their investment versus real impact.

CH2M’s program is unique – and powerful – because the investment in this type of employee-driven program directly aligns with the material needs of the corporation – reducing energy use, rehabilitating watersheds, reducing water consumption, reducing waste.

However, not all industries align so closely to benefit from employee-driven sustainability programs. It’s important when developing sustainability programs that employees do have a way to provide input and also understand why the company is making efforts in this area, but spending half of the sustainability budget – in dollars or in time investment – on a program that makes employees “feel good” or “feel committed” may not actually result in meaningful change on sustainability metrics.

Following CH2M’s example, we would propose adding an 8th step (and placing that step in the top spot), performing a materiality assessment. By doing this first, a company can clearly see where its strategies will be directly aligned with its employees priorities (as well as other stakeholders) and will rate those priorities in order of most to least impactful on the overall business. Then, harnessing the energy and developing the programming will be both successful and valuable in terms of sustainability metrics.

Are you interested in figuring out what your stakeholders are most concerned with and how those concerns match up to your organizational strategies? Contact us about performing a materiality assessment to help align your sustainability strategy and optimize it for the most impact. 

TED Talks Sustainability: Tshering Tobgay: This Country Isn’t Just Carbon Neutral – It’s Carbon Negative

The SSC Team April 21, 2016 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Nothing inspires us like a good TED talk, and here’s one of our favorites. Enjoy it!

About the speaker: Tshering Tobgay is the prime minister of the Kingdom of Bhutan. He is the second democratically elected prime minister, a social media star, and is leading his country based on principles of sustainability, well-being, and “Gross National Happiness.” Tobgay, an optimistic leader in tumultuous global environment, is focused on stability and sustainability in Bhutan.

About the talk: The Kingdom of Bhutan is a small Himalayan country of 700,000 people centered between China and India. The small nation has a commitment to remaining carbon neutral “for all time.” Learn about how the monarchy, and now this new democracy, has adopted a holistic look at development, favoring “Gross National Happiness” over gross national product.  

TED Talks Sustainability: Metali and Isabel Wijsen: Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

The SSC Team March 17, 2016 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Nothing inspires us like a good TED talk, and here’s one of our favorites. Enjoy it!

About the speaker: Sisters Melati and Isabel Wijsen launched an island-wide campaign to ban plastic bags, inspired by bag bans in other parts of the world. They share their inspirational story that has resulting in a commitment from Bali’s governor to ban bags by 2018. What will they tackle next?

About the talk: If you live in the middle of the ocean, then ocean health is always a consideration of daily life. When teen sisters Metali and Isabel Wijsen realized the harm that plastic bags were doing to their island home of Bali, they went on strike – literally a hunger strike – to push the Balinese governor to ban plastic bags. Their inspirational message about sustainability and activism is shared in this great TED talk.


TED Talks Sustainability: Metali and Isabel Wijsen: Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

The SSC Team March 17, 2016 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Nothing inspires us like a good TED talk, and here’s one of our favorites. Enjoy it!

About the speaker: Sisters Melati and Isabel Wijsen launched an island-wide campaign to ban plastic bags, inspired by bag bans in other parts of the world. They share their inspirational story that has resulting in a commitment from Bali’s governor to ban bags by 2018. What will they tackle next?

About the talk: If you live in the middle of the ocean, then ocean health is always a consideration of daily life. When teen sisters Metali and Isabel Wijsen realized the harm that plastic bags were doing to their island home of Bali, they went on strike – literally a hunger strike – to push the Balinese governor to ban plastic bags. Their inspirational message about sustainability and activism is shared in this great TED talk.


Supporting Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build Initiative

The SSC Team September 10, 2015 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

By: Alexandra Kueller

At Strategic Sustainability Consulting, we are huge supporters of paying it forward and giving back to the global community. One of the ways that we give back is by supporting Habitat for Humanity. We are proud of the efforts they put forward to provide homes for those in need, and we are always excited when they are able to build sustainable, energy-efficient housing!

Recently, a close friend of SSC, Roya Khaleeli, mentioned she was participating in Habitat for Humanity's Women Build initiative, and wanting to get involved in some capacity ourselves, we donated some money to Women Build. Women Build aims to bring over 13,000 women together from around the world to allow women-only teams build over 2,300 homes together. This is a wonderful opportunity for women to not only help give back to their communities, but it also empowers them with new skills they might not have had before.

We are eager to see the amazing results from the upcoming Women Build events, and we are excited to hear how these women are changing the lives of others.

Greening Your Non-Profit from the Inside Out

The SSC Team June 25, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this blog post from the SSC archives: Why is environmental responsibility important to an organization’s bottom line?  What are key impacts?  What does your organization’s carbon footprint look like?  Where should you begin?  These questions and more are addressed in an excellent resource that is easy-to-use and only a download away.  If you work for a non-profit or if you have non-profit clients, this is something that you will want to take a look at. “Greening Your Non-Profit from the Inside Out: A NeighborWorks® Guide for Community Development Organizations” essentially serves as a handbook that was designed to provide community development organizations with an easy-to-use resource for taking the first steps towards “going green”. Using the results of the sustainability action plans from 2008, NeighborWorks developed a manual and online course entitled “Greening Your Nonprofit Business” in 2009. The manual, produced in conjunction with Strategic Sustainability Consulting, is available free online to all network organizations and to the broader community development field to help them take steps toward environmental sustainability. The manual has been downloaded 24,000+ times since its publication in 2009, making it one of the most popular downloads on www.nw.org.  Once you start to skim you’ll quickly realize why it’s a top download and how it is still relevant today. It begins with a general introduction to the topic of environmental sustainability and prepares you for the following chapters that dive into specific green action items to get you started.  Divided into eleven “green” topics ranging from energy efficiency to customer communication, each section provides a wealth of information.  Statistics, case studies, recommendations, and other resources will help you to understand the environmental impacts of each topic and how to go about minimizing that impact in a simple, cost-effective way.  Because there is no “one size fits all” solution to going green, the manual includes website links to some of the best organizations working on the issue—where you can find a solution tailored to fit your circumstances.  This information is organized so that you can quickly find the information you need. In case you didn’t already know, we partner and work with NeighborWorks on a lot of different projects and have found their dual mission to be a perfect match for what we have to offer as well.  NeighborWorks America is the country’s leader in affordable housing and community development, working to create opportunities for lower-income people to live in affordable homes in safe, sustainable neighborhoods that are healthy places for families to grow.  NeighborWorks commits to being a leader with its network in employing and promoting equitable, green and sustainable practices for the long-term benefit of the environment so that people can live and work in healthy, ecologically friendly, and affordable places.  Learn more here and download the manual today! Find out how you can become a better sustainability leader in one of our latest blogs.

Moving Beyond Cultural Competency to Equity Literacy

The SSC Team May 14, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
By: Alexandra Kueller Take a look at the people that make up your workplace. How diverse is the group? Are they inclusive people? How do they react when someone displays a certain bias? All of these aspects are important to any workplace, because not only can these signs be indicative of a business’s reputation, but it can also monitor the success of how well everyone within the organization works together. To help bring all of this to light, the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities and Opportunity Lynchburg hosted a workshop to show examples of how to move beyond basic cultural competency in the workplace. By the end of the session, everyone walked out of the room equipped to help take their organization to the next level of equity literacy. It’s first important to note the difference in what separates cultural competence from equity literacy:
  • Cultural Competence – you are able to get along, understand, and interact with those from other cultures and socio-economic backgrounds; your actions are rooted within your best interest
  • Cultural Proficiency – you move beyond yourself and you have a deeper knowledge and grasp of those different cultures and backgrounds that surround you; your actions are not as self-serving
  • Equity Literacy – you dig below the surface to understand where the cultural differences stem from and take action to fix injustices; your actions indicate that you want to better the problem, because that is the right thing to do and not just for yourself
So how does one go from cultural competence to cultural proficiency to equity literacy in the workplace? Here are a few steps to help get you started in the right direction:
  1. Recognize biases and inequities as they come up; start to look for the ones that are subtle
  2. Respond to the biases and inequities when they are said; don't be afraid to point them out
  3. Redress the biases and inequities in the long term; acknowledge there is a problem and don't sweep it under the rug
  4. Create and Sustain a bias-free and equitable learning environment
Remember, this process takes time, and no one is going to achieve equity literacy overnight (as much as we would like to think that’s true…). Rather it’s a stepping stone to get you to the ultimate goal of equity literacy. Last fall SSC attended a workshop that focused on the business case for diversity. Read about it here.