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White Paper Worth Reading: 2016 Global Energy Market Trends

The SSC Team March 24, 2016 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

It's shaping up to be an exciting year for the energy market as various environmental, regulatory, and marketplace dynamics continue to cause tumult. 

Organizations need to know which variables in energy will impact their businesses.

Check out this white paper about the six key themes that are critical to watch in 2016. 

6 for 2016: Global Energy Market Trends

How does your company's energy risk profile look like? Do you need help assessing your impact due to energy use? Contact us for information about capturing, analyzing and reporting energy use data. 

White Paper Worth Reading: 2016 Global Energy Market Trends

The SSC Team March 24, 2016 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

It's shaping up to be an exciting year for the energy market as various environmental, regulatory, and marketplace dynamics continue to cause tumult. 

Organizations need to know which variables in energy will impact their businesses.

Check out this white paper about the six key themes that are critical to watch in 2016. 

6 for 2016: Global Energy Market Trends

How does your company's energy risk profile look like? Do you need help assessing your impact due to energy use? Contact us for information about capturing, analyzing and reporting energy use data. 

Are Google and Amazon Underestimating Their Own Carbon Footprints?

The SSC Team March 15, 2016 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Two of the world’s leading technology companies are under fire for underestimating data centers’ carbon footprints amid claims they use an obsolete tool for calculating emissions from electricity they purchase off the power grid.  

Lux Research, an independent research and advisory firm, went after the two tech giants for using tools that make broad generalizations about power production in the regions where Google and Amazon have large data facilities – reporting that the two companies may be underestimating their carbon footprints by 42,000 MT CO2e per year and 85,000 MT CO2e per year, respectively.

It’s pretty clear that Lux is using Google’s and Amazon’s data – data based on the EPA’s Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) – to tout its own analytical tool that estimates GHG emissions from electricity use.

What is important to note here is: the world of sustainability tools out there is rapidly moving. What you report today can be disputed tomorrow as new analytical tools, calculators, and data sets are developed.  

It’s not that eGRID is a terrible tool, or that Lux has built a surefire new solution, it’s more about choosing the right tool, at the right time, and at the right level of detail for your individual case.

Not every company needs a power-plant-by-power-plant analysis of its power sourcing, as the cost of a microscopic look at GHG emissions in this area may outweigh the overall variation in results. In other words, for many companies, the eGRID analysis would be absolutely acceptable based on moderate use of electricity in a given area as the overall data is within an acceptable margin of error.

However, power-intense companies like Google and Amazing, using vast amounts of energy, should absolutely be looking for the most refined and detailed tool to analyze power use impact. Being off by just a small percentage can represent tens of thousands of tons of CO2 being left un-reported, and more accurate data should help inform locations of future data centers to optimize clean power use.

If an organization is new to sustainability reporting, GHG calculating or meeting industry standards for environmental data, it is highly unlikely that that organization is going to be able to navigate these ever-changing waters without help.

Partnering with an experienced consulting firm like SSC, with the background knowledge and experience, to choose the best-fit reporting tool for every individual case is critical. Contact us today to talk about your carbon footprint analysis.  

 

 

Are Google and Amazon Underestimating Their Own Carbon Footprints?

The SSC Team March 15, 2016 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Two of the world’s leading technology companies are under fire for underestimating data centers’ carbon footprints amid claims they use an obsolete tool for calculating emissions from electricity they purchase off the power grid.  

Lux Research, an independent research and advisory firm, went after the two tech giants for using tools that make broad generalizations about power production in the regions where Google and Amazon have large data facilities – reporting that the two companies may be underestimating their carbon footprints by 42,000 MT CO2e per year and 85,000 MT CO2e per year, respectively.

It’s pretty clear that Lux is using Google’s and Amazon’s data – data based on the EPA’s Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) – to tout its own analytical tool that estimates GHG emissions from electricity use.

What is important to note here is: the world of sustainability tools out there is rapidly moving. What you report today can be disputed tomorrow as new analytical tools, calculators, and data sets are developed.  

It’s not that eGRID is a terrible tool, or that Lux has built a surefire new solution, it’s more about choosing the right tool, at the right time, and at the right level of detail for your individual case.

Not every company needs a power-plant-by-power-plant analysis of its power sourcing, as the cost of a microscopic look at GHG emissions in this area may outweigh the overall variation in results. In other words, for many companies, the eGRID analysis would be absolutely acceptable based on moderate use of electricity in a given area as the overall data is within an acceptable margin of error.

However, power-intense companies like Google and Amazing, using vast amounts of energy, should absolutely be looking for the most refined and detailed tool to analyze power use impact. Being off by just a small percentage can represent tens of thousands of tons of CO2 being left un-reported, and more accurate data should help inform locations of future data centers to optimize clean power use.

If an organization is new to sustainability reporting, GHG calculating or meeting industry standards for environmental data, it is highly unlikely that that organization is going to be able to navigate these ever-changing waters without help.

Partnering with an experienced consulting firm like SSC, with the background knowledge and experience, to choose the best-fit reporting tool for every individual case is critical. Contact us today to talk about your carbon footprint analysis.  

 

 

Scope 3 Emissions: Which Ones Matter?

The SSC Team March 3, 2016 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the SCC Archives: 

If your company is getting ready to calculate its annual carbon footprint (or is thinking about doing it for the first time), you'll definitely want to pay attention:

In this 6-minute video, SSC President Jennifer Woofter provides an overview of the new Scope 3 emissions guide – developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), and published on the Greenhouse Gas Protocol website.  Jennifer explains how different companies may choose to approach the 15 categories of Scope 3 emissions, depending on their industry, operating structure, and internal capacity.

 

If your company would like to talk about carbon footprinting or developing a sustainability report, contact us to set up a 15-minute introductory phone assessment today. 

Parent company of Puma provides detailed look at its Environmental Profit & Loss methodology

The SSC Team December 17, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

This summer, Kering, the parent company of the clothing and footwear manufacturer, Puma, not only published its EP&L, the environmental footprint of the company’s operations translated into monetary values, it published the entire methodology as an open-source tool for others to use.

The EP&L analyses the impact of Kering’s supply chain from raw materials to retail outlets and reports the impact in monetary terms.

In an article about Kering’s decision to open-source the methodology, the company’s CEO said, “Our EP&L has already served as an effective internal catalyst to drive us towards a more sustainable business model. I am convinced that an EP&L, and corporate natural capital accounting more broadly, are essential to enable companies to acknowledge the true cost on nature of doing business.”

From making the business case for sustainability to assessing carbon asset risk in monetary terms, and finally to reporting environmental results using natural capital accounting, more and more companies are moving toward currency as a way to plan, assess, and evaluate environmental performance.

This move makes sense, considering we live in the age of global capitalism.

Kering’s EP&L, along with World Bank’s WAVES initiative, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development’s Valuation Guide, the Natural Capital Coalition, and others, provide strategies to implement natural capital accounting into the sustainability reporting process.

If your company is interested in producing a sustainability report using principles of natural capital accounting, let us know! And check out our analysis of how Puma stacks up to other athletic apparel companies.

Views: Basic Psychology Can Empower Energy Efficiency

The SSC Team October 15, 2015 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the blog archives:

Most people are not aware of how much energy they are using (or wasting). Many feel as though they have little control over their monthly utility bills. However, social scientists suggest that if people were made aware of 1. their power usage costs in real time; and 2. how those costs compare to their neighbors and others in similar situations, energy conservation would be enhanced because of people’s desire to outperform.

According to Scientific American, new technology may improve awareness of our energy use and help push peoples desire to conserve energy.

One example of such new technology was employed by Southern California Edison utility which gave its consumers an Ambient Orb - a ball that sits on one’s table and communicates wirelessly with the local power grid. During peak demand hours, the ball glows red. When electricity prices are lower, the ball grows green. After only a few weeks, residents using the Ambient Orb decreased their power consumption during peak periods by 40 percent.

Competition and the ability to compare energy usage with one another may encourage further saving. A study was conducted in a small California town where all residents were notified about their energy consumption in previous weeks as well as the average consumption in their neighborhoods. Included with each month’s utility bill, individual homes were given a smiley face for bellow average consumption and a frown for an above average bill. This simple expression prompted excessive users to cut back and encouraged savers to continue saving.

These examples seem to illustrate a fundamental misconception – that being more energy efficient will somehow make life more difficult or less comfortable. A more reasonable conclusion may be that comfort is relative. Meaning, some people may actually want to do their laundry late in the evening or early in the morning if they can save money.

The article articulates another simple point - knowledge is power. People should be informed about their energy use in more effective ways!

Have you seen other technology that uses positive reinforcement or active awareness to encourage more sustainable behavior? Let us know in the comments!

Dispatch from SSC summer 2009 Intern Paul Turaew

RILA’s 2015 Retail Energy Management Report: 3 Takeaways

The SSC Team September 22, 2015 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

By: Alexandra Kueller

Last week, we took a look at RILA’s Retail Sustainability Management Report, and today we’ll be looking at RILA’s Retail Energy Management Report.

Earlier this year, the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) announced their brand new Retail Energy Management Maturity Matrix, which hopes to be a tool that will be used by retail executives, individual companies, and industry-wide to help companies focus on energy management. In September 2015, RILA released their Retail Energy Management Report that uses the matrix to analyze energy management initiatives from over 100,000 RILA member companies.

Taking the 23 dimensions related to energy management RILA has identified from six key sectors, the report looks at where the companies rank in terms of maturity: are they starting, just standard, excelling, leading, or at the next practice already. RILA presents their key findings from each dimension, then provides resources for companies to reach the next level, case studies to look over, and how to get involved on a greater scale.

Here are three observations that really stood out to us:

Dedicated energy management teams

At 85%, a large majority of the retailers surveyed indicated they have at least one fill time energy staff person, with the average company retaining about 3 full time staff members. Despite only 15% of respondents not having a full time energy management staffer, roughly 50% of the companies indicated that they use a third-party or consultant to help with their energy management. With energy management often linked to sustainability, less than 25% of the energy teams report to their company’s sustainability/CSR department, instead a lot of the energy teams report to either the Facilities or Real Estate departments.

Continuous energy management improvement

From 2014 to 2015, all dimensions except for five saw improvement in overall energy management. The sectors People & Tools and Energy Consuming Systems saw the biggest gains, with almost every dimension hitting the maturity level of “standard”. While there weren’t significant strides from last year (except for “Food Service”), the growth is still positive. As more robust energy teams and goals are put in place, there will hopefully be an increase in energy management maturity in the future.

No one has hit a plateau

And speaking of increasing energy management over the next couple of years, many retailers indicated that there are many new initiatives in place. RILA has even forecasted that many of these new initiatives, plans, and goals will help push many of the retailers to an average maturity level of “excelling”, with some companies reaching “leading” status. Even retailers that are currently at “leading” or “next practice” have indicated that more work is going to be done with energy management within their company.

Looking to start a new sustainability project but need to gain support? Find out ways to gain that support for your new project or idea here!

Grow Your Sustainability Consultancy Business by Speaking Your Client’s Language

The SSC Team July 7, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this blog from the SSC archives: So, you know all about your prospective client and you’ve decided on the strongest business case for sustainability for their situation. Now it’s time to win them over and solidify the relationship with a smashing proposal or pitch.

1) Don’t think of a pitch as a sell, think of it as an educational opportunity

Don’t worry so much about whether or not the client is going to hire you at the time you are meeting with them. Instead, treat it like a customized webinar or mini-conference where you are showcasing your knowledge about sustainability, the realities of where the economy is heading, their specific opportunities in relation to sustainability, and what they will need to do to get ahead and effectively adopt sustainability in their corporate strategic framework. You are just showing them the raw ingredients, while keeping a hold of the recipe. 

2) Start at the very beginning, a very good place to start

So, you know all about sustainability. And you know all about your prospective client. Unfortunately, your audience, be it the CEO or a mid-level executive, may not know much more about sustainability than “I think it costs a lot, but everybody seems to be doing it.” Clear that up right away with a brief definition of strategic sustainability – use the definition you use for your own consultancy. Make sure the client know that sustainability is a business framework, not a philanthropic or public relations gesture. Drop a few names, too – Wal-Mart, GE, Nike, Rio Tinto, Toyota. It doesn’t hurt for your client to know that they are joining the ranks of commerce’s elite.

3) Stress the long term and a future of change

“Fundamentally, corporate sustainability is about exploring the next way your company will be successful, because almost all the things you currently rely on -- energy, supply chain, consumers, investors, regulation -- are going to change,” said David Bent from the non-profit sustainability organization Forum for the Future in a blog series for Greenbiz.com. Changing times demand that companies factor in future risks, such as rising energy prices, increased regulation, and pressure from consumers, into their strategic plans. Since many of these future risks and market changes are going to stem from environmental and social concerns, integrating sustainability principles into the corporate framework now, to address these issues now, isn’t just a “cost” to the business, it’s an investment in the future risk management. “You can’t predict ‘the’ future, but you had better be prepared for possible futures with a portfolio of strategies – and a business case – that ‘future-proof the company’ by diversifying your risk going forward,” advises Gil Friend, founder and CEO of Natural Logic. You must stress this fact to prospective clients – they will probably have to become sustainable eventually, but they might as well make some money doing it proactively instead of reactively. Just be sure to avoid scare tactics or pressure. The fact is: the world is changing, and change can be good.

4) Look to frame sustainability as a driver for innovation and opportunity

Find examples of “play-to-win” organizations that have used sustainability to tap into new opportunities (destroying the competition in the process) to help sell the concept. Companies are inherently competitive, but often are mired in a “compliance mentality.” Remind your audience that business is a battlefield; you might be able to tap into that competitive spirit. Use what you know about the company’s competitors or industry to highlight how the sustainability program may get them ahead of the game.

5) Present the client’s customized business case in a language that everyone can understand – shareholder value

It’s meat and potatoes time. You’ve briefly discussed sustainability, the risk of not acting, and the opportunity gained by taking action. Next is what they’ve all been waiting for – the business case. At this point, be fairly specific about what you feel the key “value drivers” of a sustainability program will be for this specific organization. First, present the business case. For example, an engineering firm with a zillion vacancies on its “careers” page and a reputation of an ‘old boys club’ may benefit from a sustainability program stressing competitive advantage – a program that will help its recruitment program, shape its industry, and help it become an early mover on new and emerging areas for growth (like green design, perhaps). Second, present the projected investment (in time and money) and the estimated return on investment (ROI). According to Friend, the business case has to provide a clear ROI in the financial, operational, and strategic dimensions. But be clear that ROI in sustainability isn’t only about short-term dollars and cents. When you are talking about elements like “recruitment” and “industry shaping,” be sure to clarify that these, albeit not short-term financial returns, are “indirect” returns. While direct returns include costs (lighting retrofits or waste-reduction), indirect returns ( impacts on brand reputational value, employee productivity and retention, product quality, community goodwill, etc.) can open companies to new business as much as any marketing plan while helping reduce risk. For an in-depth discussion on costing for sustainability, check out the book Making Sustainability Work by Marc Epstein. Third, use statistics, examples, graphics, and best practices, briefly but effectively, to back up your claims on how your proposed programs can directly affect shareholder value through direct and indirect returns. Finally, give the client a path on how a sustainability program for this value driver might be incorporated into their organizational framework.

6) Don’t frighten them off

Although you may have made an amazing pitch with ROI analysis that just can’t be denied, a client may still balk. “But we don’t have $150,000 for a lighting retrofit, even if we know it will save us $300,000 over the next six years…” Yes, it may be ideal if you could tackle each value driver head on, re-write the strategic plan, and reorganize the company, but, more likely, the financial minds at your prospect’s firm are going to be reluctant to loosen the purse strings. To help ease them into the process (and help you begin to form a long, trusting relationship), break it down into steps. Begin with saying, “Now that I’ve presented the strategic sustainability framework that will eventually deliver the most value to your organization, let’s talk about where we begin. Every journey starts with a series of small steps…” At this point, have one or two programs that will work as small but effective pilot programs for this broader sustainability plan. Try to find the one or two manageable programs with the lowest-hanging, least expensive fruit, and suggest that the client give them a try first. The pilots will help you build credibility with the CFO’s office, as well as awareness throughout the rest of the organization. Hopefully by achieving documented success with the first few pilot programs, the company will continue to draw on your services to expand into the more complex strategic development of their sustainability program (that you were the architect of).

7) Be straightforward about the business relationship

Once you’ve delivered the presentation (no more than an hour of their time) and have some concrete offerings available for them (green audits, waste audits, pilot ‘Green Team’ programs, stakeholder engagement initiatives, or whatever your other pilot programs were) be ready for questions. Know how long each program will take and what it may cost if they suddenly want to go whole hog. Be prepared to answer detailed questions about customer service, your ‘next steps’ in project development, your experience, your resources, costs of your service, as well as costs directly to them (retrofits, training investments, life-cycle-analyses, etc.) and the overall estimated ROI for each suggested program. Instead of spending your time trying to convince the client through testimonials of how great you are, just do what you do best: consult them. Show them what you know and use examples from research or from your past experience to illustrate how they, too, can meet their goals, transform their business, reduce their risk, and increase shareholder value through sustainability. You are simply the person with the tools to help them get the process started. Find out how you can become a better sustainability leader in one of our latest blogs.