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Tag Sustainability

How Do Sustainability Reports Change Over Time?

The SSC Team January 19, 2016 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the SSC blog archives. 

At Strategic Sustainability Consulting, we’ve been doing sustainability reporting for TEN years – one for each year that we’ve been in business. We’ve also helped a variety of clients produce their own sustainability reports. So we know the joys and pains involved – from both sides of the experience.

A few years ago, Jennifer Woofter looked back on how SSC's own sustainability report has changed over time, we thought it might be valuable to share some of those reflections based on six years of sustainability reporting. 

While each company’s experience will be different, there are some common threads that are shared among reporting organizations.

Are you interested in writing your first, sixth or tenth sustainability report? We can help.

 

Food & Beverage Industry Demonstrates How “Business Success” Can’t be Achieved Without Sustainability

The SSC Team January 14, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

The connections between increased revenue and investment in sustainability programs are complicated.

Even today, sustainability professionals continue to “make the business case” for sustainability.

It’s true that sustainability programs require an investment—in staff, in reporting, in communications, in change management—and the case for making smart investments for maximum results must continue to be made.

However, as we enter 2016, we should no longer need to make the case for sustainability itself.

Although directly linked financial benefits are sometimes difficult to identify, research suggests companies that fully integrate sustainability principles and practices into their strategic operations do outperform peers financially.

The counterargument is that these same companies are just more strategic overall, sustainability or not, so they will perform well simply because of a culture of innovation, risk mitigation, long-term planning, and thought-leadership.

Wrong.

The fact is, as we enter 2016, a company can’t even be considered a strong, strategic player without sustainability being one of its core principles. Sustainability has made it into the short list of core principles of true strategic leadership. In other words, you can’t have one without the other.

Case in Point: The Food & Beverage Industry

Pure Strategies, a sustainability consulting firm focused on the food and beverage industry, recently published results of a survey of major global food and beverage companies.

In the 2015 report, 18% more food and beverage companies, 100% of companies surveyed, are developing or implementing sustainability programs (from 82% in 2013), and 46% of the companies reported increased sales (up from 19% in 2013).

What the report tells us is:

  • More than ever before, food and beverage companies are implementing sustainability programs based on best practices of the companies that have already implemented sustainability programs
  • As the best-practice modeling increases throughout the industry, more food and beverage companies are reporting increased sales
  • The leaders of these food and beverage companies are tying industry-wide sustainability best practices directly to their increased sales

The food and beverage survey shows how sustainability, as a core strategic focus, is permeating the very operating principles of an entire industry – and a significant percentage of companies are making more money in the process.

Using food and beverage as an example, any company looking to become a long-term leader in any sector should look seriously at its approach to sustainability.

Sustainability must truly be integrated into a company’s core strategic plans, or it will likely get left behind.

If your company looking to integrate industry best practice planning into its sustainability strategy, a great place to start is with a sustainability assessment and peer benchmarking report.

 

 

 

Three Steps to a Credible Sustainability Strategy

The SSC Team January 5, 2016 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the SSC blog archives. 

Strategic Sustainability Consulting was invited to participate in a trade association's annual board meeting a while back to discuss what they could do on the sustainability frontier.

SSC President Jennifer Woofter gave a short presentation called, “Three Steps to a Credible Sustainability Strategy.”

Since the presentation was so well received, we've put together a short recap in a series of three X minute videos. 

Step 1: Create a clear strategy statement:

Step 2: Develop realistic and substantial programs: 

Step 3: Reporting! Share performance metrics:

If your company would like to talk with a sustainability consulting expert about carbon footprinting, please contact Strategic Sustainability Consulting today!


Sustainability Consulting Round Up: Best of our blog for 2015

The SSC Team December 31, 2015 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Each month, we highlight some of our more popular content on the SSC blog.

To wrap up 2015, here's a round-up of our most popular blog posts published this past year. These are the articles that received the most attention from our online audience. Check them out!

  1. 4 Reasons Why Corporate Sustainability Reporting Might be a Waste of Time
  2. 8 Steps to Becoming a Better Sustainability Consultant
  3. 6 Ways to Gain Support for your New Sustainability Project
  4. 5 Habits that Might be Stunting Your Sustainability Leadership
  5. 7 Ways to Get Attention for Your Sustainability Plan

If you like an article, please consider sharing it online via your favorite social media platform. Helping us grow our audience is the #1 way you can show your support for the work that we do.

Happy New Year! 

Moody’s releases assessment of environmental risk by sector

The SSC Team December 15, 2015 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Moody’s, the bond credit rating agency, recently published two new reports, their global assessment of how environmental risks affect credit ratings and a report that shows how these risks vary across industry sectors (registration required to view).

It’s great to have both reports published because one can see how Moody’s approaches the data and then the results of applying their assessment standards.

Essentially, the agency looked at direct environmental impacts AND consequences of regulatory/policy impacts, crunched those numbers with materiality and timing projections, and, voila – they’ve published a risk profile by industry of 86 global sectors.

The highest risk sectors are projected to hold more than $2 trillion in debt with material credit exposure to environmental risk.

Which sectors are at the highest level of risk? Of course, coal is up there on the top, but some of the others are bound to surprise you.

Check out Moody’s assessments and let us know if you see any surprises on the high-risk list.

If your organization is looking to assess its own climate risk, or perform a materiality assessment to help prioritize sustainability efforts, contact us today.

TED Talks Sustainability: Harish Manwani, COO – Unilever: Profit is not always the point

The SSC Team December 8, 2015 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Nothing inspires us like a good TED talk, and here’s one of our favorites. Enjoy it!

About the Speaker: Harish Manwani joined global consumer products corporation Unilever as a management trainee in 1976; he is now the company's chief operating officer.

About the Talk: Capitalism has delivered some amazing things to society, but also some devastating ones as well. Although we may think that capitalism, and corporations, are all about the bottom dollar, Manwani argues that corporations can, and must, include the “fourth G” in measuring success: growth that is sustainable

Ask a Sustainability Consultant: What is Sustainability?

The SSC Team December 1, 2015 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the SCC archives. 

We have been providing sustainability consulting services to organizations worldwide for more than a decade. But, we still find that the sustainability journey is just beginning for many. Here is a post from our archives helping define sustainability. Although the videos are oldies-but-goodies, we still see the value in these straightforward explanations. 

HOW DO YOU DEFINE SUSTAINABILITY?

The answer is not always simple.  Some people think sustainability is a destination, some people think sustainability is a journey (we think it's a little bit of both).  Some people like lofty definitions, like these three: 

Meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.  (Brundtland Commission)

The possibility that human and other forms of life on earth will flourish forever. (John Ehrenfeld, Professor Emeritus. MIT"

Enough - for all - forever. (African Delegate to Johannesburg (Rio+10))

We like those definitions as a rallying call to inspire people to think broadly about sustainability.  But they aren't very helpful when it comes to actually putting sustainability into action.  

For that reason, we love The Natural Step's Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development.  It is based on a scientific consensus about how our world is unsustainable, and then provides four principles that eliminate those causes of unsustainability.  This video is a quick overview:

That's the concept of sustainability that we use here at Strategic Sustainability Consulting.  But it can still be kind of vague -- difficult to put into specific operation in part because a single organization operating within society cannot, on its own, do all of the things necessary to move society toward sustainability.  That's where sustainability strategy comes in.

This video is from Tim Nash of Strategic Sustainable Investments, who is a fellow alumni of the Strategic Sustainability graduate program at Blekinge Institute of Technology in Karlskrona, Sweden (where SSC president Jennifer Woofter also graduated).  It expounds on The Natural Step Framework, and explain how strategy becomes part of the process:

So that's it.  THAT is how we define sustainability.  We believe that these four system conditions provide the foundation upon which we create a sustainable society.  And an organization operating within our current unsustainable world must create a strategy to navigate through that funnel to maximize the value it delivers while minimizing the risk of hitting the "walls of the funnel".

Agree?  Disagree?  Let us know in the comments.

If your investors are assessing your climate risk, shouldn’t you be?

The SSC Team November 12, 2015 Tags: , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
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This summer, the World Resources Institute and the UNEP Finance Initiative consulted with more than 100 energy, climate, and finance experts to create a discussion framework for investors to weigh exposure to the risks of climate change.

Essentially, it is a toolkit for investors to evaluate a company based on climate risk factors not directly related to physical risk. Most investors can already pick out obvious physical risks, i.e. investing in coastal property as sea levels rise. But non-physical, climate-change effected risks are also important.

The WRI discussion framework addresses those risks, called carbon-asset risks. They include public policy, regulation, technology, unpredictable market conditions, and shifting public opinion.

This discussion framework is an excellent tool for investors to weigh risks as they choose to make investments, but we argue that companies themselves should be looking at this tool to discover their own carbon asset risks and then engaging in some deeper-level analyses and audits.

For example, the assessment recommends that investors look beyond carbon footprinting and delve deeper into company supply chain audits that may uncover risks. For example:

  • Geographic location (are too many of your suppliers in the path of a super-typhoon?),
  • Local regulations (are the countries your source your raw materials from looking to legislate and increase your costs?),
  • Diversification in operations or production (are your products and services too dependent on fossil fuels?).

This discussion framework, while absolutely useful for investors, can also be used as a cheat sheet for your own business. Next step: Start auditing and taking action now to mitigate your climate risk.

Reducing exposure to risk is crucial, not only to become more attractive to investors, but also to become a more sustainable organization overall!

If you’re ready to start looking more deeply at your carbon asset risk, contact us to learn more about sustainability assessment and supply chain analysis.

Sustainability Consulting Round-Up: Best of Our Blog for October

The SSC Team October 29, 2015 Tags: , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Each month, we highlight some of our more popular content on the SSC blog!

In case you missed them, here's a round-up of our most popular blog posts from this past month. These are the articles that received the most attention from our online audience. Check them out!

  1. Puma, Adidas, Under Armour - Who Has the Best Sustainability 
  2. Companies with GREAT Sustainability Websites
  3. Using Risk as a Lens for Sustainability Decision-Making
  4. Life Cycle Analysis Can Help You Write a Better ‘Continuity Plan’
  5. 5 Ways to Benchmark Your Sustainability Performance

If you like an article, please consider sharing it online via your favorite social media platform. Helping us grow our audience is the #1 way you can show your support for the work that we do.

More evidence that you should wait to act on sustainability

The SSC Team October 22, 2015 Tags: , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this post from the blog archives. 

We wrote, “Why You Should Wait to Act On Sustainability” for Environmental Leader. The comments were...interesting, and showed that there was a lot of disagreement about the premise to move more slowly and thoughtfully on corporate sustainability initiatives. But we're sticking to our guns- and we’re very pleased to see more evidence that supports our position.

In the Inc. article, “How to Make Better Decisions: Slow Down”, author Jessica Stillman provides a great round-up of some of the best thinking and ideas regarding fast vs. slow decision-making. Here are some of the highlights:

In their new book, Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work, brothers and academics Chip (of Stanford Graduate School of Business) and Dan Heath (of Duke) explore how to eliminate biases and improve the quality of our decisions. One of the biggest decision-making mistakes they tackle is our tendency not to waffle but to decide too quickly. Stanford's Re:Think newsletter explains that the authors devote a considerable portion of the book to the idea of widening your options, advice that may seem at odds with the very definition of decision making. 

This is huge insight for sustainability practitioners, who should remember that one of the best ways to widen your options is to engage with stakeholders along the value chain. Don't just ask your green team to come up with great ideas -- ask your suppliers, your customers, your contractors, and your investors. 

The goal, in other words, isn't to go fast and eliminate options. It's to slow down and add them. So how do you accomplish this? The key, the authors say, is taking the time to gather information and alternatives. Using devil’s advocates, asking people who have solved similar problems, gathering relevant statistics, and soliciting the advice of friends and family members can all help.

While you're gathering all of this information, it can be helpful to have a structured process in order to capture insights for later review. After all, it's easy to lose track of who said what, emerging themes and where they are coming from, and ideas worth following up on. So take some time BEFORE you begin your decision-making process to think about how you will engage, and how you'll manage the inflow of information.

You might object that today's market moves too fast for such lollygagging. But Heath replies that considering less information rarely actually saves time, either because we make bad decisions (and then stick with the path we've chosen long after we should abandon it) or because we waste time anyway waffling over limited data and alternatives.

Yes! Based upon our sustainability consulting experience, we have found that taking the time to gather lots of options has allowed our clients to make confident decisions and execute them fully -- rather than make half-cocked initiatives that get only partial support or just lip service.

The Heath brothers aren't the only people warning leaders not to be seduced by quick decision making, of course. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman wrote a whole best-selling book on the limitations of quick thinking called, appropriately, Thinking, Fast and Slow. If you haven't picked it up yet, it's well worth a read in full and is packed with examples of how our knee-jerk decision-making machinery can lead us astray, as well as techniques to short-circuit bias. But for the quick-and-dirty summary, look to Harvard Business Review, which offers this article on one technique, the premortem, and another article by Kahneman himself outlining the basics of why quick decision making is often bad decision making

So what do you think? Leave a comment here, or join the conversation on Twitter