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RILA’s 2015 Retail Energy Management Report: 3 Takeaways

The SSC Team September 22, 2015 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

By: Alexandra Kueller

Last week, we took a look at RILA’s Retail Sustainability Management Report, and today we’ll be looking at RILA’s Retail Energy Management Report.

Earlier this year, the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) announced their brand new Retail Energy Management Maturity Matrix, which hopes to be a tool that will be used by retail executives, individual companies, and industry-wide to help companies focus on energy management. In September 2015, RILA released their Retail Energy Management Report that uses the matrix to analyze energy management initiatives from over 100,000 RILA member companies.

Taking the 23 dimensions related to energy management RILA has identified from six key sectors, the report looks at where the companies rank in terms of maturity: are they starting, just standard, excelling, leading, or at the next practice already. RILA presents their key findings from each dimension, then provides resources for companies to reach the next level, case studies to look over, and how to get involved on a greater scale.

Here are three observations that really stood out to us:

Dedicated energy management teams

At 85%, a large majority of the retailers surveyed indicated they have at least one fill time energy staff person, with the average company retaining about 3 full time staff members. Despite only 15% of respondents not having a full time energy management staffer, roughly 50% of the companies indicated that they use a third-party or consultant to help with their energy management. With energy management often linked to sustainability, less than 25% of the energy teams report to their company’s sustainability/CSR department, instead a lot of the energy teams report to either the Facilities or Real Estate departments.

Continuous energy management improvement

From 2014 to 2015, all dimensions except for five saw improvement in overall energy management. The sectors People & Tools and Energy Consuming Systems saw the biggest gains, with almost every dimension hitting the maturity level of “standard”. While there weren’t significant strides from last year (except for “Food Service”), the growth is still positive. As more robust energy teams and goals are put in place, there will hopefully be an increase in energy management maturity in the future.

No one has hit a plateau

And speaking of increasing energy management over the next couple of years, many retailers indicated that there are many new initiatives in place. RILA has even forecasted that many of these new initiatives, plans, and goals will help push many of the retailers to an average maturity level of “excelling”, with some companies reaching “leading” status. Even retailers that are currently at “leading” or “next practice” have indicated that more work is going to be done with energy management within their company.

Looking to start a new sustainability project but need to gain support? Find out ways to gain that support for your new project or idea here!

3 Observations from RILA’s Retail Sustainability Management Report

The SSC Team September 17, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

By: Alexandra Kueller

This past spring, the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) announced their brand new Retail Sustainability Management Maturity Matrix, which hopes to be a tool that will be used by retail executives, individual companies, and industry-wide to help companies become more sustainable. Fast-forward to September 2015, and RILA just released their Retail Sustainability Management Report that uses that matrix to analyze sustainability initiatives from over 50,000 RILA member companies.

Taking the 27 dimensions related to sustainability management RILA has identified from seven key sectors, the report looks at where a lot of the companies rank: are they starting, just standard, excelling, leading, or at the next practice already. RILA presents their key findings from each dimension, then provides resources for companies to reach the next level, case studies to look over, and how to get involved on a greater scale.

Here are three observations that really stood out to us:

What comprises a retail-based sustainability team?

RILA offered a breakdown of how many retailer’s sustainability teams look like, and over 50% of those surveyed indicated that there is one person or no full time employee dedicated to sustainability (and a surprising 10% of companies have 10 or more people working on sustainability full time). Often times, the sustainability team will set the sustainability goals for the company, but almost a quarter of the retailers said they do not have sustainability goals. And in terms of budgeting for sustainability, almost 75% of companies said their budget either stayed the same or increased over the past year.

The leaders are well ahead of the pack

When looking at how the retailers did across all dimensions, it becomes apparent most companies are falling firmly in the "standard" category (or rather a 2 on a 1-5 scale). But the leading companies aren't just one or two steps higher, they are already at the "next practice" level (or a 5 on a 1-5 scale). Looking at all of the dimensions, over half the time the leading company was getting top marks - only in 4 dimensions was the leading retailer at the "excelling" level (or a 3 on a 1-5 scale). Leading companies obviously know what they're doing when it comes to sustainability, so now there needs to be an effort to get everyone else up to their level.

A shift to the supply chain

Overall, the supply chain section was one of the weakest, with many companies falling between the “starting” and “standard" category, but as retailers begin to solidify their internal sustainability, there is a growing focus on supply chain sustainability. Companies have started to engage suppliers about various sustainability issues, such as the need to reduce energy and water.

Looking to start a new sustainability project but need to gain support? Find out ways to gain that support for your new project or idea here!

How Sustainability Practitioners Should Give Feedback

The SSC Team September 15, 2015 Tags: , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this article from the SSC blog archives:

As consultants, it's our job to deliver feedback to our clients throughout the sustainability consulting engagement--and we've gotten pretty good at identifying, refining, and delivering news (both good and bad) about a company's "state of sustainability" and roadmap for action. But when we read the article, Don’t Sugarcoat Negative Feedback, in Harvard Business Review, we realized that the art of providing feedback has a much broader application to companies pursuing sustainability initiatives. Here are some of our takeaways:

USE FACTS IN YOUR FEEDBACK

Berglas: Deliver constructive feedback rapidly in its raw form. This doesn’t mean harshly; there’s a way to soften blows without delaying them if you strive to be empathic. Just never make it seem like you’re avoiding hard cold facts. All that does is make the facts seem worse than they are.

Focusing our feedback on facts is a great way to create some space between participants, so that no one feels blamed, guilty, or shamed. It also allows everyone to (more) objectively assess the situation--including whether the feedback being provided is correct, how a solution should be constructed, and how responsibility and accountability for change should be allocated.

Wrong: [After 20 minutes of praise and exultation about everyone's awesome sustainability work.] "Look, even though we're all doing our best, it's not enough. We're falling behind on our performance data, and that's shown up in some recent press. We can't let our industry leave us in the dust. Come on, guys, we've got to improve!"

Right: "Our three-year carbon emissions are up 4.3%, while Competitor A is holding steady and Competitor B actually decreased its emissions by 1.1%. A report, which is getting press coverage this week in the New York Times and a number of "green blogs", calls us out for poor energy and climate performance in our industry. Let's talk about what that means in light of last month's board meeting where there was consensus about aiming for the top 25% of our industry across all sustainability issues."

DON'T PREDICT THE OUTCOME

Berglas: Resist the urge to prophesy. The absolute worst thing a CEO, coach, or consultant can do when offering constructive criticism to someone is to provide a timetable for the process that a person who must change should be expected to conform to.

While goals and targets are critical elements of effective sustainability planning, changing people (and institutions) is an uncertain process. When you need to address employee engagement and organizational culture issues, don't make promises that you can't keep. Yes, you can get a new Code of Ethics in place by the end of the year, but can you put a clear time line on when your emerging-market suppliers are going to really *get* the concepts of anti-bribery and corruption? You can provide a clear road-map, but putting calendar dates down for personal and organizational change is a dangerous proposition.

BE HONEST ABOUT THE EFFORT REQUIRED TO CHANGE

Berglas: Don’t minimize the challenge. When you critique someone with a history of success you have to assume that the flaws you see in them are (a) entrenched, and, (b) something they have long grappled with to suppress or get past. Saying, “No big deal” to that sort of issue can scare the socks off someone who knows that what you’re targeting for change is an issue they have battled unsuccessfully for years.

Sustainability is probably the biggest, most complex challenge that the world has ever faced -- and individual organizations trying to navigate a highly interconnected system in which it has limited leverage and resources is not an easy task. (Hah, understatement!) So don't portray the journey as all rainbows and kittens. It's going to be hard, and there are going to be really tough decisions. People need to understand that the road is going to be long, and the challenges are going to be scary--but that all great, epic adventures start with a seemingly insurmountable mountain to climb.

Looking to start a new sustainability project but need to gain support? Find out ways to gain that support for your new project or idea here!

What Sustainability Practitioners Need to Know About Water

The SSC Team September 8, 2015 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this article from the SSC blog archives:

While carbon emissions management and reporting tend to be the first "big picture" sustainability issues that companies tackle, water is poised to become "the next big thing" in terms of corporate sustainability risk management. As always, we're staying on top of it--culling through the best resources and guides to help our clients effectively tackle the issue.

Because we love to share- and don't want to re-create the wheel- here are three articles that bring home the most important tools, concepts, and frameworks related to corporate water management. Enjoy!

The four pillars of water risk assessment 

In this economic climate and as part of our natural lives we are all familiar with undertaking risk assessments in our everyday professional and personal existence; from the most basic travel decisions ensuring punctuality, to the most comprehensive health and safety issues ensuring the safety of our colleagues in the workplace.

How far away is a standardised approach to water reporting? 

With corporate awareness of water-related risk growing exponentially, so the demand for a standard means of measuring and reporting water usage increases. Katharine Earley explores current practice in benchmarking usage at a global level, and examines the tools and guidelines available to companies as they unravel the complex web of their water footprint. 

Reporting water risks: A step-by-step guide 

An increasing number of companies are experiencing detrimental water-related business impacts, including operational or supply chain disruptions and property damage from flooding, to name a few. These impacts can be costly -- in 2011 they cost some companies up to $200 million -- and have caught the attention of investors around the world. To make the reporting process easier, WRI has aligned its Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas with CDP’s water questionnaire. 

If you are interested in corporate water management, you'll love our free white paper Every Last Drop: Water and the Sustainable Business. Got another water resource to share? Leave a comment, or talk to us on Twitter (@jenniferwoofter).

What Sustainability Practitioners Need to Know About Water

The SSC Team September 8, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this article from the SSC blog archives: While carbon emissions management and reporting tend to be the first "big picture" sustainability issues that companies tackle, water is poised to become "the next big thing" in terms of corporate sustainability risk management. As always, we're staying on top of it--culling through the best resources and guides to help our clients effectively tackle the issue. Because we love to share- and don't want to re-create the wheel- here are three articles that bring home the most important tools, concepts, and frameworks related to corporate water management. Enjoy!

The four pillars of water risk assessment

In this economic climate and as part of our natural lives we are all familiar with undertaking risk assessments in our everyday professional and personal existence; from the most basic travel decisions ensuring punctuality, to the most comprehensive health and safety issues ensuring the safety of our colleagues in the workplace.

How far away is a standardised approach to water reporting? 

With corporate awareness of water-related risk growing exponentially, so the demand for a standard means of measuring and reporting water usage increases. Katharine Earley explores current practice in benchmarking usage at a global level, and examines the tools and guidelines available to companies as they unravel the complex web of their water footprint.

Reporting water risks: A step-by-step guide

An increasing number of companies are experiencing detrimental water-related business impacts, including operational or supply chain disruptions and property damage from flooding, to name a few. These impacts can be costly -- in 2011 they cost some companies up to $200 million -- and have caught the attention of investors around the world. To make the reporting process easier, WRI has aligned its Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas with CDP’s water questionnaire. If you are interested in corporate water management, you'll love our free white paper Every Last Drop: Water and the Sustainable Business. Got another water resource to share? Leave a comment, or talk to us on Twitter (@jenniferwoofter).

6 Ways to Gain Support for Your New Sustainability Project

The SSC Team September 3, 2015 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

By: Alexandra Kueller

You’re a member of your company’s sustainability team, and you just thought of a brand new sustainability project for your company to undertake. This project will not only help better the environment, but also help save the company money! But what’s the hold up? Often, like many other new projects and ideas, sustainability-related projects get lost in the shuffle.  

In a Harvard Business Review article called “A Guide to Winning Support for Your New Idea or Project", author Rebecca Knight discusses several ways you can win support and get people on board for your new project. We decided to add a sustainability twist to her idea and help you find new ways to gain momentum for your new sustainability project.

1. Understand What’s Motivating You

If you want to successfully pitch and sell your new idea, be sure you are able to explain why. If you want your company to undertake a carbon footprint, it’s a good idea to have a response that goes beyond “it can help the environment in the long run.” Identify why you think your company should invest resources into a carbon footprint and be able to articulate those thoughts.

2. Think Small

Sure, it would be great if every company could have a top-to-bottom sustainability makeover, but unfortunately that’s not the reality. Business still have actual businesses to run and can’t throw an endless supply of resources to the sustainability team. Think small, and try to get as specific as possible. The more precise you are with your goals and outcomes, the better chance you have to get people to respond. It’s much easier to dismiss a large, lofty goal than something that seems more tangible.

3. Gather Feedback

You might think that proposing a materiality assessment is a great idea, but what do your coworkers think? If you find yourself with colleagues who might have interest in the idea, present it in an informal manner, such as “What do you think of our company going through a materiality assessment?” You’ll be able to quickly hear any concerns or questions they might have, allowing you to tighten up your plan to make sure it is a sure-fire success.

4. Sell, Sell, Sell

As Knight mentions in her article, selling your idea is more of a campaign than a singular event. If you want your company to undergo a life cycle assessment, bring up the idea – often. This is when you need to market your idea and get as many people on board as you can. Make your coworkers understand what a life cycle assessment is and why it’s important for your company to complete one; try to get as much agreement as you can.

5. Propose a Pilot

Perhaps you have initial support for your idea of publishing an annual sustainability report, but there’s still some pushback. Instead of having an “all or nothing” mentality, suggest writing a rough skeleton outline of a sustainability report. This way people can get a better sense of what a report would look like, and it’s a fairly low time commitment. And if the sustainability report isn’t approved, minimal resources were wasted.

6. Don’t Get Discouraged

No matter what type of work you are doing, any time someone doesn’t approve of a new project or idea you suggested, it’s easy to get discouraged. Instead, gather feedback. Was your idea for a waste audit shot down because of budgeting reasons or rather your bosses needed some more time to think on it? Just because your project wasn’t accepted initially doesn’t mean there isn’t a chance to complete your waste audit in the future. Keep your head up and continue to advocate for sustainability projects within your company.

Are simple mistakes holding back your sustainability? Find out how to correct those mistakes here!

Should You Pare Down Your Sustainability Agenda?

The SSC Team August 27, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this blog from the SSC archives: At the beginning of the year, a lot of people find themselves making long lists of things to achieve over the next 12 months. And ambitious sustainability agendas are no exception--it seems like we're always being pushed to do more, move faster, and achieve greater sustainability performance. After all -- we know that global challenges can't be solved by half-measures. Today, we're challenging the idea that you must do "better" sustainability by doing "more" sustainability-related activities. Instead, let's look at the benefits of doing less. And we'll start by reviewing an article called The Art of Adding by Taking Away by Matthew E. May, published last January in The New York Times. May begins his article with a quote from ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu: “To attain knowledge, add things every day. To attain wisdom, subtract things every day. Profit comes from what is there, usefulness from what is not there.” This saying sparked something in May, who began to investigate the logic of problem solving by taking things away: "It dawned on me that I’d been looking at my problem in the wrong way. As is natural and intuitive, I had been looking at what to do, rather than what not to do. But as soon as I shifted my perspective, I was able to complete the project successfully." May finds that there are many ways to tie the "doing more by doing less" thinking into the business world:
  • By removing distractions, companies can focus on what really matters.
  • By searching for patterns and finding common elements, companies can spot opportunities earlier and streamline decision-making.
  • By removing product features, companies can drive innovation and reach new audiences.
So what does this mean for sustainability practitioners? Take a hard look at your company's sustainability activities -- are they clearly aligned and focused with your business strategy? Are they designed to mitigate your biggest environmental and social impacts? Are they responsive to your key stakeholders? Or...are your company's sustainability activities spread too thin and flow in so many directions it is difficult to adequately keep track of them? If your sustainability agenda doesn't revolve around a clear strategy, it's time to get off the merry-go-round and do a little paring. Here's what we suggest:
  • Conduct a materiality assessment to identify and prioritize your (internal and external) stakeholders and what they care about. This will give you a short list of sustainability topics that are the most important, and a longer list of "nice to have" activities to tackle as time permits.
  • Assess each of your existing sustainability activities against a materiality matrix. If you find that activities are falling outside of the "must have" sustainability priorities, you should consider redirecting resources to more important places.
  • Develop guidelines to help you address the importance, effectiveness, and urgency of any new activities under consideration. This will keep you on the straight and narrow going forward.
If you'd like some help in conducting a materiality assessment, please contact us! We love to take clients through this process--it's enlightening, empowering, and energizing to identify what's important (and what you can leave behind). In the meantime, we love May's final advice about how to apply this thinking to your own life: "First, create a “not to do” list to accompany your to-do list. Give careful thought to prioritizing your goals, projects and tasks, then eliminate the bottom 20 percent of the list — forever." "Second, ask those who matter to you most — clients, colleagues, family members and friends — what they would like you to stop doing. Warning: you may be surprised at just how long the list is." "The lesson I’ve learned from my pursuit of less is powerful in its simplicity: when you remove just the right things in just the right way, something good happens." Have you tried this approach? We'd love to hear what you're giving up in 2014, and what you're making more room to do! Leave us a comment or join the conversation on Twitter.

Using Sustainability to Avoid Risk

The SSC Team August 25, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this blog from the SSC archives: The evidence that sustainability can be good for business is overwhelming. Most of the case studies, examples, and analysis that has been done show positive links between a sustainable approach to environmental and social issues, and corporate profits, Thus far, the research has been primarily focused on direct operational efficiencies (like retrofitting your office lighting to save money and reduce your carbon footprint), innovation (using biomimicry to drive new product development), and productivity (ie. more engaged employees take less sick leave). However, there hasn't been as much talk about the nexus between sustainability and risk management. And for corporations operating in complex supply chains in a globally-connected economy -- well -- effective risk management can be the difference between success and failure. Below, we take a look at three articles that shed light on why companies still struggle to incorporate sustainability into their risk management practices (and vice versa).

Has sustainability become a risky business? 

This GreenBiz article by John Davies reviews a report by Ernst & Young. The key takeaway: While more companies are concerned about increased risk and the proximity of natural resource shortages, corporate risk response appears to be inadequate to address the scope and scale of some of these challenges. The free report looks at six corporate sustainability trends with a strong focus on the internal influencers of corporate performance (CEOs and boards), as well as external forces ranging from governments to shareholders and investors.

Playing It Safe Is Riskier than You Think

This article by Bill Taylor in the Harvard Business Review makes the case that "difficult and uncertain times are often the best times for organizations to separate themselves from the pack, so long as their leaders are prepared not to stand pat." While not directly about sustainability, this article certainly supports the notion that economic turmoil is no reason not to be ambitious about tackling big sustainability challenges.

Research: Why Companies Keep Getting Blind-Sided by Risk

by Mary Driscoll in the Harvard Business Review presents fascinating insight into why companies (and their executives) are not succeeding at identifying and mitigating risk. Survey findings indicate that most organizations’ leaders did indeed express concern about the impact of political turmoil, natural disasters, or extreme weather. But the findings also show that the people at the front lines of the business were hamstrung by a lack of visibility into risk. Nearly half said they lacked the resources needed to adequately assess business continuity programs at supplier sites. Many relied on the suppliers filling out perfunctory, unreliable checklists. There are some big lessons here for sustainability practitioners! Are simple mistakes holding back your sustainability? Find out how to correct those mistakes here!

Data Management Concepts for Sustainability, Pt. 4

The SSC Team August 20, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
This article was written as an expansion of our white paper “Choosing Sustainability Management Software for your Business” published in July 2011.  If you’re looking for information on how to make your software selection, check out the full article.  If you just want to make sense of this particular topic, keep reading.  Whether you like this article or not, we want to hear from YOU so that we can continue to provide the best insight for YOU, our readers…  Our series on Sustainability Software continues with “Data Management Concepts for Sustainability”.  In this article (Part 4 of 4), we’ll complete the introduction and definition of key Data Management terms (read Part 3 here).  Our end goal with this series is to enable YOU, as the Business Leader, to feel more comfortable in a technical discussion related to the various areas of Data Management, especially as related to the care and feeding of Sustainability Software packages. Being able to “talk the talk” is the best defense in the technology wilderness.  Just remember, at the basis of any technical term is a common sense business notion, and staying grounded to this notion will help keep your conversations from drifting astray.

Data Integration

Data Integration is one of the most difficult of the activities covered in this series because it involves most of the different activities working in concert with each other.  For example, it is implicit in Data Movement between systems where the Data models are different.  Suppose we have data in our Accounting system that will be used in a cost calculation algorithm (method) in our Sustainability Software.  To do this, we need to copy the Accounting data, then reshape it to conform to the load utilities for our package and proceed with the load.  This setup entails numerous subtleties including the cross referencing of the source data model in the Accounting System with the format of the import utility.  This is called Field Mapping and it’s not just an easy matching question where you can get the first few right and guess the rest.  Examples will help us here.
  • Suppose we need to deal with quantity shipment data and the target model is asking for unit prices and volumes.  We might need to deduce the carbon content per gallon from the available carbon content per fifty five gallon barrel, or just divide by 55.
  • A more complex example involves translation from the English System to the Metric System (raise your hand if you can do this without a calculator).
  • Another example would be the rules concerning the potential for rounding errors for large quantities.
  • A final classic example is how to deal with Asian names (commonly listed with the surname first) being transferred into a system with a European paradigm (where the surname is listed last).
Data Integration is expensive to build and more expensive to operate.  SaaS is a way to avoid the Integration Tax to the extent possible since it has already been built into many of the downstream systems you’ll be using.

Data Mining

Data Mining is the last major topic to be introduced.  It also involves smatterings of the others, but has a unique ad-hoc character at its essence. Suppose we have a database that describes product production events in a manufacturing setting.  Suppose also that we wish to learn more about root causes of some recurring problem that has escaped previous attempts to solve it and choose to “look at all the occurrences at once”.  Someone who is expert in the data itself, as well as all the business processes it describes could attempt to construct queries that will reveal common conditions that led to the problem occurrences.  For example, he might notice they all tend to fall in the first half hour of their respective production runs.  Further drill down might reveal they all involve late shipments from the same raw material vendor, while production runs with timely shipments from the same vendor seem to go without mishap.  This would lead us to suspect potential spoilage or lack of maturity in the late arriving material.  Data Mining is a spiral learning discipline.  One spirals in to a common cause, or spirals out to learn the nature of the Cosmos.

Conclusion

We hope that as a result of this information, albeit somewhat high-level, you’ll find a greater degree of ease in approaching Data Management problems and their solutions with any Sustainability Software package that you may be considering.   As with the rest of this series, our goal is to guide you through each of these complex topics and bring them safely toward a solution that will provide you with robust and accurate data and data management practices that will last for years to come. Now that you’ve read this article, tell us what you think!  And be sure to check out the full white paper.

Data Management Concepts for Sustainability, Pt. 3

The SSC Team August 18, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
This article was written as an expansion of our white paper “Choosing Sustainability Management Software for your Business” published in July 2011.  If you’re looking for information on how to make your software selection, check out the full article.  If you just want to make sense of this particular topic, keep reading.  Whether you like this article or not, we want to hear from YOU so that we can continue to provide the best insight for YOU, our readers…   Our series on Sustainability Software continues with “Data Management Concepts for Sustainability”.  In this article (Part 3 of 4), we’ll continue introducing and defining key Data Management terms (read Part 2 here).  Our end goal with this series is to enable YOU, as the Business Leader, to feel more comfortable in a technical discussion related to the various areas of Data Management, especially as related to the care and feeding of Sustainability Software packages. Being able to “talk the talk” is the best defense in the technology wilderness.  Just remember, at the basis of any technical term is a common sense business notion, and staying grounded to this notion will help keep your conversations from drifting astray.

Data Movement

Data Movement is one of the silent cost areas of Data Management.  This entails the replication of data into a system and then out of it on to another system.  For example, suppose you have selected the ideal Sustainability Software offered in a SaaS-based contract by a reputable vendor.  A qualified consultant is hired to mastermind the installation and the ideal algorithms are determined, tested and approved.  All we need now is to move the company transaction data into it and let it do its work to produce the outputs we desire.  What can be so hard about that? Strong vendors of Sustainability Software will provide robust utilities to import data into their system and to export data from it.  These must receive special attention from your Consultant and from your IT staff who will need to know how they work, at least for diagnostic scenarios. We list some additional considerations below.

Data In

Suppose your consultant determines your current operational control systems can supply the data your new Sustainability Software needs and a prototype has proven this to everyone’s satisfaction.  It seems like all we need to do is to rerun the prototype code every day and everything will work. Axiom of Design:  Everything needs to be designed at least three times: Once to see if we even really want what we had in mind, once more to learn how to build the ongoing system, and once more to really build what we imagined.  Then Continuous Improvement kicks in. You are in the process of building what is called a Data Movement Application.  Any process that is repeated will fail often in new ways not anticipated.  Yes, computers can break and humans make mistakes frequently, but tornadoes and blizzards happen too. We want repeating processes to repeat as planned, and this is why the first design of any software will be replaced.  Moreover, you are probably required to prove to an auditor that all your data is being transmitted and received with very few errors that are themselves being analyzed and accounted for.  This is motivation for an Automated Balance and Control system that manages your Data Movement and assures its accuracy and timeliness.  If you intend all the work to be “outsourced”, be sure to consider these factors in your negotiations.  At minimum, be prepared to self-ensure for these events—they will happen.

Data Out

There are two main reasons to move data out of your Sustainability Software.
  1. To provide a report for approved readers
  2. To supply calculated data to another system
Reporting is technically “easy” now with all the Business Intelligence platforms that are available.  Vendors include Microsoft, Oracle, IBM and many others.  These tools are expensive but would be cost effective for SaaS providers because they can scale to serve many end users.  They are being enhanced daily to also support information display on tablets and smart phones, so you can digest this information over the Internet from nearly any place in the world. Data transfer to another system, however can be a different story.  This will be a Data Movement Application and all the considerations we’ve raised above apply here as well, except your system is now the supplier of data and another system is the recipient.  The complexities arise not only from engineering for repeatability, but from the likely need to translate source data so the target system can receive and interpret it appropriately. (TO BE CONTINUED…)  Now that you’ve read this article, tell us what you think!  And be sure to check out the full white paper.