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TED Talks: Luciana Walkowicz of NASA – Let’s not use Mars as a backup planet

The SSC Team January 12, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Nothing inspires us like a good TED talk, and here’s one of our favorites. Enjoy it!

About the Speaker: Lucianne Walkowicz works on NASA's Kepler mission, searching for places in the universe that could support life.

About the Talk: Walkowicz spends her days looking for planets like our own, but as she does this challenging work, she us to think carefully about how we treat our own home world. In this short talk, she suggests that we stop dreaming of Mars as a place that we'll eventually move to when we've messed up Earth, and to start thinking of planetary exploration and preservation of the Earth as two sides of the same goal. As she says, "The more you look for planets like Earth, the more you appreciate our own planet."

 

3 Sustainability Tools that got our Attention in 2015

The SSC Team January 7, 2016 Tags: , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

We appreciate good calculation tools. We are constantly looking for the most comprehensive or best combinations of calculation tools to cross check and ensure our clients are getting the best possible data. 

Here were three tools that got our attention in 2015:

GCSP-ITC Quick Scan Tool – Launched in June, this open-source tool allows companies to compare their compliance policies against best practices in order to inform improvements in supply-chain management. Provided by the Global Social Compliance Programme (GCSP), it is open to GCSP members and others free of charge.

  • How it works: Buying companies can identify standards others use in purchasing. Suppliers can create a self-assessment, benchmark the assessment against peers, and identify immediate steps to move toward best practice.
  • Who should use it: Anyone with a medium to lengthy supply chain or who is a supplier.

Water Risk Valuation Tool – Launched in September by Bloomberg ESG Data and Tols, this calculator illustrates how water risk can be valuated in corporate mining valuation models. Based on the gold and copper mining industries, this tool can inform all mining companies on how water risk might effect earnings and operations.

  • How it works: The tool models potential “asset stranding” based on estimated future water scarcity and risk factors related to that scarcity.
  • Who should use it: Mining companies, especially in precious metals

RiskHorizon – Launched in October by Anthesis Group, this web-based toold quantifies and monetizes environmental, social, and governance risk over 25 political, economic, social, and environmental areas, aggregating 100 different datasets.

  • How it works: The tool is designed to help “futurecast” risks and opportunities in assets, supply chain, and business model and then quantify and prioritize the value of that risk. A big job.
  • Who should use it: Investors, risk management professionals, supply chain managers, and strategic leaders should all be interested in a company’s risk profile.

One thing to remember - data out of context or too generalized really won't do anyone any good. Ensure you're working with a sustainability professional that can help validate and contextualize your data in your reporting process and sustainability planning programs.  

Have you used a calculator, but aren’t quite sure how to take action on results? Let us know. We can help assess your findings and customize a plan to help your company align with best practice in sustainability.

Making the case for water conservation? Communicate risk in dollars and cents

The SSC Team October 6, 2015 Tags: , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

With extreme heat, drought conditions and raging wildfires in the headlines around the world, water and water conservation has been top of mind this summer and fall.

We have been talking about water sustainability in terms of corporate sustainability assessment, reporting and risk management for years. But many companies are just now looking at ways to assess their water risk.  

If you’re on the sustainability team, there is no better time than right now to make the case for performing a risk assessment and developing a sustainable water strategy to help mitigate business risk.

One of the best ways to speak the language of company leadership is to present risk in terms of dollars and cents.

Monitize how water scarcity may impact revenue

The Water Risk Monetizer is a tool that enables water-dependent businesses to look at their current and future water risks, with direct-impact insight into how water, or water scarcity, will impact revenue.  This free financial modeling tool will help water-dependent businesses better understand the current and future value of water.

When supply and demand meet water

A basic human need, water is likely the most under-priced natural resources in the global economy. Water costs to business have the potential to dramatically increase, or be made unavailable for business needs, as public opinion and government policy shift to ensure equal access for basic human consumption. 

Businesses can expect the cost and availability of water to increase, and should plan now to incorporate those increased costs, or look for ways to minimize water use, to ensure financial viability in an age of water scarcity.

Understand water risk, plan for water reduction

A monetized water scarcity assessment will help companies identify areas where risk exists today and in the future.

But, performing a cursory risk assessment is just the first step. Next, you’ll need to delve into actionable solutions to mitigate risk before it becomes a revenue loss – supply chain analysis, production technologies, factory siting, R&D strategy, or even product phase-out planning.

Make the case for water conservation, and then push for some real strategic water sustainability strategy.

If you are interested in corporate water management, you'll love our water footprinting tools. Got another water resource to share? Leave a comment, or talk to us on Twitter (@jenniferwoofter).

What Sustainability Practitioners Need to Know About Water

The SSC Team September 8, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments
Enjoy this article from the SSC blog archives: While carbon emissions management and reporting tend to be the first "big picture" sustainability issues that companies tackle, water is poised to become "the next big thing" in terms of corporate sustainability risk management. As always, we're staying on top of it--culling through the best resources and guides to help our clients effectively tackle the issue. Because we love to share- and don't want to re-create the wheel- here are three articles that bring home the most important tools, concepts, and frameworks related to corporate water management. Enjoy!

The four pillars of water risk assessment

In this economic climate and as part of our natural lives we are all familiar with undertaking risk assessments in our everyday professional and personal existence; from the most basic travel decisions ensuring punctuality, to the most comprehensive health and safety issues ensuring the safety of our colleagues in the workplace.

How far away is a standardised approach to water reporting? 

With corporate awareness of water-related risk growing exponentially, so the demand for a standard means of measuring and reporting water usage increases. Katharine Earley explores current practice in benchmarking usage at a global level, and examines the tools and guidelines available to companies as they unravel the complex web of their water footprint.

Reporting water risks: A step-by-step guide

An increasing number of companies are experiencing detrimental water-related business impacts, including operational or supply chain disruptions and property damage from flooding, to name a few. These impacts can be costly -- in 2011 they cost some companies up to $200 million -- and have caught the attention of investors around the world. To make the reporting process easier, WRI has aligned its Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas with CDP’s water questionnaire. If you are interested in corporate water management, you'll love our free white paper Every Last Drop: Water and the Sustainable Business. Got another water resource to share? Leave a comment, or talk to us on Twitter (@jenniferwoofter).

What Sustainability Practitioners Need to Know About Water

The SSC Team September 8, 2015 Tags: , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

Enjoy this article from the SSC blog archives:

While carbon emissions management and reporting tend to be the first "big picture" sustainability issues that companies tackle, water is poised to become "the next big thing" in terms of corporate sustainability risk management. As always, we're staying on top of it--culling through the best resources and guides to help our clients effectively tackle the issue.

Because we love to share- and don't want to re-create the wheel- here are three articles that bring home the most important tools, concepts, and frameworks related to corporate water management. Enjoy!

The four pillars of water risk assessment 

In this economic climate and as part of our natural lives we are all familiar with undertaking risk assessments in our everyday professional and personal existence; from the most basic travel decisions ensuring punctuality, to the most comprehensive health and safety issues ensuring the safety of our colleagues in the workplace.

How far away is a standardised approach to water reporting? 

With corporate awareness of water-related risk growing exponentially, so the demand for a standard means of measuring and reporting water usage increases. Katharine Earley explores current practice in benchmarking usage at a global level, and examines the tools and guidelines available to companies as they unravel the complex web of their water footprint. 

Reporting water risks: A step-by-step guide 

An increasing number of companies are experiencing detrimental water-related business impacts, including operational or supply chain disruptions and property damage from flooding, to name a few. These impacts can be costly -- in 2011 they cost some companies up to $200 million -- and have caught the attention of investors around the world. To make the reporting process easier, WRI has aligned its Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas with CDP’s water questionnaire. 

If you are interested in corporate water management, you'll love our free white paper Every Last Drop: Water and the Sustainable Business. Got another water resource to share? Leave a comment, or talk to us on Twitter (@jenniferwoofter).

How Sustainability is Saving Chinese Textile Mills Money

The SSC Team April 16, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , Strategic Sustainability Consulting No comments

By: Alexandra Kueller

It’s no secret that China is not an environmentally progressive country. Beijing is plagued by air pollution, over 100 cities are facing water scarcity issues, almost a third of China’s rivers are too polluted for human contact, and to top it all off, as a nation China is one of the highest emitters of carbon dioxide. 

One of China’s largest polluters are their textile producers. Responsible for roughly 50% of the world’s fabrics, textile manufacturing is a very environmentally un-friendly process that results in high energy and water use. The industry is responsible for the being the third largest dischargers of wastewater and the second largest user of chemicals in China. 

All hope is not lost, though. With the help of the National Resources Defense Council’s (NRDC) Clean By Design program, Chinese textile manufacturing facilities are using green tactics to not only reduce energy and water consumption, but also help them save money as well.

The NRDC recently released a report stating that the 33 textile mills that are using the Clean By Design program are saving an estimated $14.7 million annually. By going after the “low-hanging fruit” – the low-cost, easy to implement projects – the textile manufacturers are helping to make a strong business case for sustainability.

Here are some of the ways the Chinese textile mills have not only reduced their environmental impact, but also saved money along the way:

Electricity Reductions

10 of the 33 textile mills went after projects that helped reduce electricity consumption. While the average reduction was only 4%, some of the more impactful projects yielded a 9% reduction with over $21,000 in annual savings. As a bonus, this project paid for itself in only a month!

Water Reuse

31 mills implemented 53 projects that resulted in an average of 9% water savings, with some of the top mills reducing water consumption by 20%. A lot of the reuse efforts focused on targeting process water and grey water, because those tended to yield the largest and most cost-effected reductions. Some mills installed a water treatment process, and that initial investment of $7,600 paid for itself in three months.

Energy Recovery

Through 173 projects that focused on electricity reduction, every participating mill saw an average reduction of 6%, with the top mills seeing a 10% reduction in energy. A majority of the projects saw efforts to recover heat from exhaust gas, water, and oil due to the fact that they produced that largest, most cost-effective reductions: a $500,000 investment yielded roughly $650,000 in annual returns.

Looking for ways to reduce your company's carbon footprint? Learn more by checking out our white paper!